South: The Endurance Expedition PDF ↠ South: The


South: The Endurance Expedition ➮ [Ebook] ➩ South: The Endurance Expedition By Ernest Shackleton ➺ – Buyprobolan50.co.uk As war clouds darkened over Europe in , a party led by Shackleton set out to make the first crossing of the entire Antarctic continent via the Pole But their initial optimism was short lived as ice fl As war clouds darkened over Europe in , a party led by Shackleton set out to make the first crossing South: The eBook ¾ of the entire Antarctic continent via the Pole But their initial optimism was short lived as ice floes closed around their ship, gradually crushing it and marooningmen on the polar ice Alone in the world s most unforgiving environment, Shackleton and his team began a brutal quest for survival And as the story of their journey across treacherous seas and a wilderness of glaciers and snow fields unfolds, the scale of their courage and heroism becomes movingly clear.

    South: The Endurance Expedition PDF ↠ South: The team began a brutal quest for survival And as the story of their journey across treacherous seas and a wilderness of glaciers and snow fields unfolds, the scale of their courage and heroism becomes movingly clear."/>
  • Paperback
  • 416 pages
  • South: The Endurance Expedition
  • Ernest Shackleton
  • English
  • 16 January 2019
  • 0142437794

About the Author: Ernest Shackleton

Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton, CVO, OBE was an Anglo Irish merchant naval officer who made his reputation as an explorer South: The eBook ¾ during what is known as the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration, a period of discovery characterised by journeys of geographical and scientific exploration in a largely unknown continent, without any of the benefits of modern travel methods or radio communication.



10 thoughts on “South: The Endurance Expedition

  1. leslie leslie says:

    This is a most first hand account of Shackleton and his last bid to cross the Antarctic He had traveled in the ship he named the Endurance with 27 other men Unfortunately, the ice froze him in With the explosive sounds and many leaks, the men knew the craft was doomed Shackleton kept their minds and bodies in shape by keeping them busy unloading the vessel.The book is made up of real entries into both the ship s log and individual journal entries Before the boat sank, some photos were saved This is a most first hand account of Shackleton and his last bid to cross the Antarctic He had traveled in the ship he named the Endurance with 27 other men Unfortunately, the ice froze him in With the explosive sounds and many leaks, the men knew the craft was doomed Shackleton kept their minds and bodies in shape by keeping them busy unloading the vessel.The book is made up of real entries into both the ship s log and individual journal entries Before the boat sank, some photos were saved These are in the book A sadder take could not be told Young people stranded on the ice No real land to be found Many photos included n this book, one knows the people involved Pictures taken by Frank Hurley.The men were marooned on Elephant Island There to wait their savior Shackleton, who tried to find help though WEI had already begun.Fortunately, he had friends Many died waiting This is a highly recommended and MUST READ

  2. E. G. E. G. says:

    MapsIntroductionPreface South The Endurance Expedition Appendix I Scientific WorkSea Ice NomenclatureMeteorologyPhysicsSouth Atlantic Whales and WhalingAppendix II The Expedition Huts at McMurdo SoundIndex

  3. notgettingenough notgettingenough says:

    I doubt there could be areal life example of the What would you take to a desert island than Shackleton s trip to the Antarctic There is an exhibition of the photographs of that trip on at the RGS in London at the moment One of the photos shows a wall of books, his floating library The RGS has been able to digitally enhance it, so that we now know exactly what Shackleton took on this unhappy expedition.Can you judge a book by its cover Magazine correctly judged by cover from The On I doubt there could be areal life example of the What would you take to a desert island than Shackleton s trip to the Antarctic There is an exhibition of the photographs of that trip on at the RGS in London at the moment One of the photos shows a wall of books, his floating library The RGS has been able to digitally enhance it, so that we now know exactly what Shackleton took on this unhappy expedition.Can you judge a book by its cover Magazine correctly judged by cover from The Onion The fact is that one often can And taking that notion a little further, surely we can judge a man by the covers of his books That s something, with the advent of electronic book reading, that we will never be able to do again It is so easy and cheap to download that one can never make assumptions about the relationship of the book to the machine owner Here, however, of course we are entitled to draw conclusions The man bothered to take the books to Antarctica The books mean something.I ve arranged the list in order into literaturelinguistic and general referenceexplorationBetween the general reference section and the exploration books I ve squeezed in two non fiction books, one by the socialist JB Askew and one by Alfred Dreyfuss.As for literature, it is interesting to note that it is relatively light on our notion of classics Most of them are the best sellers or maybe, to convert to our idiom, the Goodreads trending books of his time There are quite a few murder mysteries or similar.I m guessing that those reading this have never heard of Gertrude AthertonAmelie RivesMontague GlassIan HeyAEW MasonDavid BoneHerbert FlowerdewJohn Joy BellLouis TracyWilliam J LockeRex BeachRobert Hugh BensonH De Vere StacpooleYet Atherton was compared with Wharton, Rives was the EL James of her day, and William J Locke made the best selling US novels list in five different years His stories were made into films 24 times, including Ladies in Lavender starring Dench and Maggie Smith in 2004 and four of his books made Broadway as plays In fact, although not one of my 500 goodreads friends has reviewed any of these authors, Locke is still well read and loved, judging by the reviews I confess I did not know his name.Potash and Perlmutter, the comic rag trade merchants of Monatague Glass, were all the rage amongst New York Jews Stacpoole is the author of The Blue Lagoon of the film fame some would say infamy and Flowerdew used his novels to proselytise on the rights of women rest here

  4. Christopher Christopher says:

    First it was cold And then it got really cold And we re hungry And it cold and we re hungry And phewy, it s really freaking cold We don t have a whole lot to eat, either Brrrrrrrrrrrr Ice Seals Cold Es muy frio Teeth chattering Chewing on blubber Blubber fires Shivering Needfood Did I mention it s cold Seriously, I m really cold Frostbite Shoulda worn another sweater Shoulda brought an extra pair of gloves Shoulda brought some extra cans of Pringles I could really go First it was cold And then it got really cold And we re hungry And it cold and we re hungry And phewy, it s really freaking cold We don t have a whole lot to eat, either Brrrrrrrrrrrr Ice Seals Cold Es muy frio Teeth chattering Chewing on blubber Blubber fires Shivering Needfood Did I mention it s cold Seriously, I m really cold Frostbite Shoulda worn another sweater Shoulda brought an extra pair of gloves Shoulda brought some extra cans of Pringles I could really go for a beefsteak or some Twinkies Wind Cold Ice Frigid Awful, terrible, no good, very bad, arctic weather Cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and cold and hungry and did I mention cold It s really COLD

  5. Carmen Carmen says:

    This is an astonishing story of courage, determination, leadership and survival It s amazing such a story as this is true, but the book gets quite boring in parts.

  6. Gator Gator says:

    South by Ernest Shackleton was published in 1919, long before Lansing s book Endurance, which was published in 1959 Both books are very similar and tell for the most part the same story, however Lansings delivery is superior, however it was with great interest that I went from Endurance to South and have no problem with the week I dedicated to Shackelton s memoir When I look back at those days I have no doubt that Providence guided us, not only across those snowfields, but across the stor South by Ernest Shackleton was published in 1919, long before Lansing s book Endurance, which was published in 1959 Both books are very similar and tell for the most part the same story, however Lansings delivery is superior, however it was with great interest that I went from Endurance to South and have no problem with the week I dedicated to Shackelton s memoir When I look back at those days I have no doubt that Providence guided us, not only across those snowfields, but across the storm white sea that separated Elephant Island from our landing place on South Georgia I know that during that long and racking march of thirty six hours over the unnamed mountains and glaciers of South Georgia it seemed to me often that we were four, not three I said nothing to my companions on the point, but afterwards Worsley said to me, Boss, I had a curious feeling on the march that there was another person with us Crean confessed to the same idea One feels the dearth of human words, the roughness of mortal speech in trying to describe things intangible, but a record of our journeys would be incomplete without a reference to a subject very near to our hearts

  7. Annie Smidt Annie Smidt says:

    Despite sitting here in October whining to myself about my cold fingers while typing, I have to admit I ve got kind of a thing for grueling polar expeditions and the occasional 19th century disastrous sea voyage I especially have a thing for Mr Shackleton, the great heroic failure of the Edwardian era Not my words, but I don t recall who said them someone on NPR, I expect.This book is the detailed accounts of Shackleton s last Antarctic journey He takes a crew on the Endurance to the Wed Despite sitting here in October whining to myself about my cold fingers while typing, I have to admit I ve got kind of a thing for grueling polar expeditions and the occasional 19th century disastrous sea voyage I especially have a thing for Mr Shackleton, the great heroic failure of the Edwardian era Not my words, but I don t recall who said them someone on NPR, I expect.This book is the detailed accounts of Shackleton s last Antarctic journey He takes a crew on the Endurance to the Weddell Sea on the South American side of the South Pole, while another crew heads to the Australia side The plan is for the Australia side crew to set a series of food and supply depots from the coast to the center of the continent and then retreat, while Shackleton and his crew make their way, by dog and man power to the South Pole, and then continue clear across the continent, picking up the pre laid supplies along the way Only, as you may know, both teams encounter unbelievable set backs and, well, it all does not work out And everyone is very cold This book is mostly Shackleton reconstructing events from his own logs, and, for the parts where he wasn t there, fromt he journals of his crewmates He never boasts or makes any of the bravery he exhibited seem like it s anythingthan the least he could have done in the circumstances His telling is, for the most part, calm, detailed and almost scientific in it s rigor with frequent mentions of exact longitudes and latitudes, weather specifics, animal species sited and ice conditions , but here and there he ll relate long hours of contemplation where he ponders the best thing to do for the men His decisions are always made for their welfare and, at least as he tells it, favoritism or self interest never enter into the equation Beyond the sheer adventure facet, the truly remarkable aspect of the story why it is so frequently remembered and retold still is Shackleton s leadership Despite preposterous odds and the most treacherous of circumstances, he managed to return the entire crew of the Endurance to safety with only a touch of frostbite, after 3 years cut off from the world in Antarctica And they all, according to the diaries Sir Ernest excerpts in his own book, kept relatively cheery and grateful for him the whole time I m not one of those leadership people, who raves on about leadership, in the business sense Yeah, sure, it s important to have someone competent and inspiring and visionary making big decisions and guiding the works, but I m not going around yapping about it all the time and pillaging the leadership and management section at the bookstore But I do think this book said something big to me about leadership about the importance of keeping your cool no pun intended and being at once in the trenches doing the dirty work along with everyone else and also able to step back and see the big picture and make the hard decisions And that people can band together and remain positive in the absolute suckiest of circumstances with the right role modelsTangentially, here is huge irony with the fact that this voyage took place as WWI broke out indeed, the Endurance left England the same week sanctioned by King Many of the men who Shackleton saved from the horrors of ice, the polar seas in rowboats and foodlessness came back to get promptly mowed down in the trenches of Europe Also, tangentially Frank Hurley, the photographer on the Endurance made some of the most amazing photographs and movie reels in the history of photography and the fact that they got back to civilization in tact is unbelievable fragile glass plates and such He was one of the first people to experiment with early color photographs They re extremely beautiful and it s quite haunting, really, to see these men, in 1914, in color, in the ice Edwardian color photography has become a new obsession of mine, reallyIn summary, it s a dry read, to be sure, but fascinating, nonetheless

  8. Mark Mortensen Mark Mortensen says:

    Prior to reading Sir Ernest Shakelton s harrowing voyage aboard the Endurance I knew few facts other than he obviously survived to pen his memoir.The expedition to be the first to cross the Antarctic continent from sea to sea over roughly 1,800 miles by way of the South Pole Planning for the mission began in 1913 and when World War I erupted the scientific voyage was not canceled It s historic that on August 4, 1914 King George V kept his appointment to meet with Shakelton and give him the Uni Prior to reading Sir Ernest Shakelton s harrowing voyage aboard the Endurance I knew few facts other than he obviously survived to pen his memoir.The expedition to be the first to cross the Antarctic continent from sea to sea over roughly 1,800 miles by way of the South Pole Planning for the mission began in 1913 and when World War I erupted the scientific voyage was not canceled It s historic that on August 4, 1914 King George V kept his appointment to meet with Shakelton and give him the Union Jack flag to prominently display on his trip Later on the same day Great Britain declared war against the Central Powers and entered the Great War For many WWI was the great adventure however on August 8th the Endurance departed England and the rugged scientific crew, full of mixed emotions were off on their own unique adventure The ship was loaded with many provisions along with teams of sled dogs, which set a suspenseful atmosphere similar to a Jack London novel.Along the way forced implementation of contingency plans became a reality and similar to the youth fighting continents away in WWI the biologists had to deal with their own do or die basic survival instincts The details will be left for the reader to comprehend Throughout the ordeal Shakelton and his men provided leadership skills and maintained a clam positive attitude When the crew finally reconnected with society they were amazed the World War was still raging Due to their eventual location many teamed up with the New Zealand Field Forces.The book serves as a great testament to the willpower of mankind Faced with failure, accomplishments surfaced

  9. Alex Alex says:

    I read this casually, a little at a time It s one of the great adventure stories of all time, and smashing stuff get it buthere s how it works it s based on the journals of Shackleton and everyone else in his party he gives others lots of time too and the entries can be a little repetitious Like, y know, Still stuck on an iceberg Cold and hungry Shackleton s a surprisingly good writer, though Clear, engaging and often funny That livens up the doldrum periods but also, the ef I read this casually, a little at a time It s one of the great adventure stories of all time, and smashing stuff get it buthere s how it works it s based on the journals of Shackleton and everyone else in his party he gives others lots of time too and the entries can be a little repetitious Like, y know, Still stuck on an iceberg Cold and hungry Shackleton s a surprisingly good writer, though Clear, engaging and often funny That livens up the doldrum periods but also, the effect of the long passages in which nothing dramatic happens is that when something does happen, it happens with extraordinary, direct impact His account of minor spoiler, I guess the final destruction of the Endurance is just crushing An incredibly powerful moment The immediacy of the epistolaryish format, with its you are here feel, makes the big moments of the expedition directly heartbreaking.After his account of the main expedition, he starts completely over with what happened with the other boat, the Aurora You will have forgotten they exist by this time This is a tough one it s just as compelling a story they actually had it worse, if you can believe that, and again it s based on journals so it has that you re right there feel to it, but there s no avoiding the fact that, having slogged all the way through Shackleton s brutal story, you groan a little when you realize you re about to start over.I guess I d suggest laying it aside and picking it up later for this part It is much shorter, at least And it s much shorter even than it looks, because after the story of the Aurora s landing party again, this really is great stuff on its own , Shackleton backtracks again, to the people who stayed on the Aurora, and that part is utterly skippable Nothing whatsoever happens I read it so you don t have to Just stop there

  10. Dagny Dagny says:

    Extremely interesting and riveting in places even knowing how it all turned out.Available at Extremely interesting and riveting in places even knowing how it all turned out.Available at

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