Turban for the Crown: The Islamic Revolution in Iran

Turban for the Crown: The Islamic Revolution in Iran ❴KINDLE❵ ✽ Turban for the Crown: The Islamic Revolution in Iran Author Said Amir Arjomand – Buyprobolan50.co.uk The Iranian revolution still baffles most Western observers Few considered the rise of theocracy in a modernized state possible, and fewer thought it might result from a popular revolution Said Amir A The Iranian revolution still baffles the Crown: PDF/EPUB ì most Western observers Few considered the rise of theocracy in a modernized state possible, and fewer thought it might result from a popular revolution Said Amir Arjomand s The Turban for the Crown provides a thoughtful, painstakingly researched, and intelligible account of the turmoil in Iran which reveals the importance of this singular event for our understanding of revolutions Providing Turban for PDF or crucial historical background, Arjomand examines both the structure of authority in Shi ism one of the two main branches of Islam and the impact of the modern state on Iranian society, two factors essential to the comprehension of the revolution ofHe then describes the emergence of Khomeini the infusion of petrodollars into the economy the blatant political corruption and Khomeini s disposal of Bakhtiar, Bani Sadr, for the Crown: PDF/EPUB å and Bazargan, consolidation of religious rule, and establishment of a constitution based on a new interpretation of Islamic principles.


About the Author: Said Amir Arjomand

Said Amir Arjomand is Professor the Crown: PDF/EPUB ì of Sociology at the State University of New York at Stony Brook He earned his PhD at the University of Chicago in He was the founder and first President of the Association for the Study of Persianate Societies and Editor of International Sociology He edited a special double issue of that journal on Constitutionalism and Turban for PDF or Political Reconstruction March He has held appointments at St Antony s College, Oxford, the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, Sociology and Development Studies, University of California, Berkeley, the Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study in Social Sciences, and the Divinity School of the University of Chicago, His article, Constitutions and the Struggle for Political Order A Study for the Crown: PDF/EPUB å in the Modernization of Political Traditions, European Journal of Sociology , won the Section s Award for the Best Essay in Comparative and Historical Sociology in His books include The Shadow of God and the Hidden Imam l , The Turban for the Crown The Islamic Revolution in Iran , and Rethinking Civilizational Analysis Edited with Edward Tiryakian, in press At Princeton, he was the inaugural Martin and Kathleen Crane Fellow in Law and Public Affairs.



10 thoughts on “Turban for the Crown: The Islamic Revolution in Iran

  1. Erik Graff Erik Graff says:

    This, sad to say, is the first book I ve ever read about modern Iran During the revolution of 1979 such reading as I did was in the popular press or from a leftwing perspective Now, having heard war drums beating out of Washington against Iran for years and having seen the Argo movie, I decided to look at the events leading up to the Iran of today a bitclosely.Arjomand writes of the Iranian revolution from a sociological perspective, his eye very much on contemporary theories of revoluti This, sad to say, is the first book I ve ever read about modern Iran During the revolution of 1979 such reading as I did was in the popular press or from a leftwing perspective Now, having heard war drums beating out of Washington against Iran for years and having seen the Argo movie, I decided to look at the events leading up to the Iran of today a bitclosely.Arjomand writes of the Iranian revolution from a sociological perspective, his eye very much on contemporary theories of revolution, many of which he cares to refute employing Iran as a counterexample In the course of this he gives a quick overview of historical trends beginning in the 16th century which crested in the state versus clergy and other sectors of society ultimately dominated by the clergy struggle of the seventies and early eighties In addition, he presents a portrait of traditional Shi ism against which he contrasts the version promulgated by Khomeini and his successors.The picture isn t pretty This book came out in the late eighties, its analyses ending in 1986 At that point at least Iran is portrayed as being on a par with Saudi Arabia with thought police on the streets, a bloody court system, oppressed women and minorities the whole ugly business reminiscent of the Nazis and led by men just as out of touch with reality Yet, this is not to say that their revolution wasn t popular or that their current government isn t but that, too, is reminiscent of the German state before their invasion of the USSR


  2. Andrew Andrew says:

    Read Chapter 10, and you re good to go The rest of the book is muddled and isn t worth the slog Meanwhile, the comparative revolution section 10 should have been his primary focus beyond just the last chapter, rather than the afterthought that he makes it out to be It is your book if you have an eye for history that readslike an inventory and constantly refers back to classical, 19th century texts like Weber, Durkheim, and Tocqueville This is not your book if you re just looking for Read Chapter 10, and you re good to go The rest of the book is muddled and isn t worth the slog Meanwhile, the comparative revolution section 10 should have been his primary focus beyond just the last chapter, rather than the afterthought that he makes it out to be It is your book if you have an eye for history that readslike an inventory and constantly refers back to classical, 19th century texts like Weber, Durkheim, and Tocqueville This is not your book if you re just looking for an easily graspable, introductory or better analysis of the Iranian revolution


  3. Phillip Welshans Phillip Welshans says:

    Extremely dense treatment of the years leading up to and then immediately proceeding the Iranian Revolution of 1979 I read only certain chapters of the book, as I was focusing mainly on the months leading up to the Revolution and the underlying drivers within Iran that brought revolution about However, this is a book I would return to when I want to do an even deeper dive on post WWII Iran Arjomand gives a very granular account of what transpired in under the Iranian republic after WWII, the Extremely dense treatment of the years leading up to and then immediately proceeding the Iranian Revolution of 1979 I read only certain chapters of the book, as I was focusing mainly on the months leading up to the Revolution and the underlying drivers within Iran that brought revolution about However, this is a book I would return to when I want to do an even deeper dive on post WWII Iran Arjomand gives a very granular account of what transpired in under the Iranian republic after WWII, the coup that brought the Shah back to power in the 60s, and then the conditions throughout that period that made the theocratic revolution and Khomeini s heirocracy the winning force What I found really interesting was how the liberal intelligentsia mostly middle class professionals and the military came to accept the revolution The former mistook Khomeini for a leader who would rescue Iran from the corruption of the Shah and usher in an inclusive government built upon a liberal interpretation of the Sacred Law The latter viewed the clerics as the political winner of the revolution and the top brass then shifted allegiances once the middle ranking officers revealed that they had been allied with Khomeini in their hearts all along In both cases, the moderates failed to realize what they were facing until it was too late and the clerics had consolidated power, ousted or humiliated what moderate politicians remained after the Shah, dissolved the secular Majles parliament , and tightened their grip on Iranian society And throughout the whole Revolution, the U.S was viewed as largely dithering about whether the Shah was worse than a military junta that never materialized By the time the U.S made up its mind what to support, it was too late and the hostages in the embassy were already being taken My only gripe would be that the detail of the book can also work against it if you the reader aren t interested in getting quite so granular However, the book is broken up into digestable and well titled chapters and sub chapters, so with a little skipping around and title interpretation, it s not a huge deal I give it 4 stars, but would likely give 3.5 if Goodreads allowed that So, in all, a very well done account and a must read if you want to peel back the myths about the Iranian Revolution and try to understand the who, what, and why of the matter


  4. Rflutist Rflutist says:

    I recommend this book if you are interested in certain aspects of Iranian history specifically, how Iran s economy operated prior to the Constitutional Revolution, and the initial modernization of the Iranian state I learned that Iran called upon a French banker, then upon an American one, when it wished to set up its economic procedures in the late 1920 s It made me stop to think about how much the relationship between the U.S and Iran has changed The author is meticulous in defining the P I recommend this book if you are interested in certain aspects of Iranian history specifically, how Iran s economy operated prior to the Constitutional Revolution, and the initial modernization of the Iranian state I learned that Iran called upon a French banker, then upon an American one, when it wished to set up its economic procedures in the late 1920 s It made me stop to think about how much the relationship between the U.S and Iran has changed The author is meticulous in defining the Persian Farsi Arabic words which appear throughout the book Some may be distracted by it in the beginning of reading, but I found that it is helpful when reading other books or articles on Iran A few words have commonly entered into English usage, but a great many have not.Bear in mind that this book was written published in 1988, a decade after the Iranian Revolution Its strength lies in what happened, not necessarily the whys or thought process behind what happened As such, a reader will want to consult other works for current events Nevertheless, this book is a fine introduction to the facts of Iranian history


  5. Adam Adam says:

    This is a reread So worth it.


  6. Jess Jess says:

    Possibly my favorite non fiction book ever right now It s pretty dense and hard to read but brilliantly woven.


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