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Leaving Tinkertown ❴Ebook❵ ➢ Leaving Tinkertown Author Tanya Ward Goodman – Buyprobolan50.co.uk When Tanya Ward Goodman came home to New Mexico to visit her dad at the end of 1996 he was fifty five years old and just beginning to show symptoms of the Alzheimer's disease that would kill him six y When Tanya Ward Goodman came home to New Mexico to visit her dad at the end of he was fifty five years old and just beginning to show symptoms of the Alzheimer's disease that would kill him six years later Early onset dementia is a shock and a challenge to every family but the Wards were not an ordinary family Ross Ward was an eccentric artist and collector whose uniue museum Tinkertown brought visitors from all over the world to the Sandia Mountains outside Albuuerue In this book Tanya tells Ross's story and her own sharing the tragedy and the unexpected comedy of caring for this funny stubborn man who remained a talented artist even as he changed before his family's eyes.

  • Kindle Edition
  • 242 pages
  • Leaving Tinkertown
  • Tanya Ward Goodman
  • English
  • 07 March 2014

10 thoughts on “Leaving Tinkertown

  1. Heidi The Reader Heidi The Reader says:

    This is Tanya Ward Goodman's memoir about how she loses her father and grandmother first through Alzheimer's and then to death Leaving Tinkertown is a powerful look at end of life issues and family love It is an incredibly raw and straight forward account of a period of unimaginable change in the author's lifeTanya handles the deterioration of her father very well I suspect that this ability to uickly and seamlessly accustom herself to change probably evolved from her childhood experiences with her father at carnivals and on road trips With the background changing continuously she had to change too but hold on to some essential part of herself This characteristic served her well during her adult yearsTanya's father was a prolific artist Because of his extreme creativity I think that she was exposed to his mercurial moods long before he began losing his battle with Alzheimer's Artistic types seem to walk a fine line between logical thinking and madness Their families get to walk that journey with them That doesn't mean that his descent into darkness didn't hurt Tanya but that she was able to cope with his moment to moment shifts in behavior because she had experienced them beforeThrough this adversity she grows closer to her brother step mom and mother as they work together to care for her dadTanya doesn't gloss over her family's shortcomings but comes to accept everything that each person brings to the table I am starting to understand that doing all you can do even if it doesn't seem like very much is enough pg 193When a strong vital person in your life is no longer able to care for themselves it's heartbreaking My own grandfather a force of nature lost some of his heart when the family had to take the keys to the car away because he didn't have the strength to drive safely any This book was hard for me to read because Tanya knows what it feels like to cause that type of pain tooIt brought back so many small moments when I was in a care taking position for him You want to provide the best uality of life that you can but when the person can no longer clean feed or clothe themselves then the really difficult decision making begins Tanya and her relatives seem to make the process relatively simple even though I know that it is anything but thatWe all know that we're not going to live forever but when you're dealing with loss of physical strength or mental capacity in your own life or the lives of those you love you get very close to that idea It's like the difference between looking through a window and having your face smashed up against the glass When it's right there you can't look awayI'd recommend this for anyone who is caring for an aging or ill family member and needs a reminder that it's all going to turn out alright As Tanya reminds us we just need to do all that we can do even if it doesn't seem like it is very muchI received a free copy of this book through Goodreads First Reads program Thanks for reading

  2. Mike S Mike S says:

    Disclaimer I have known Carla and Ross and Eric and Tanya for many years But whether I had known them or not I would still have found this to be one of the most powerful and poignant memoirs I have read Tanya is incredibly frank and open about her feelings and relationships with everyone involved and it is fascinating to watch the relationships change and evolve over the time of the book As a son who is dealing with a parent entering dementia the book was revealing and helpful with understanding the difficulties and occasional joys of coping with a parent who is mentally slipping away I enjoyed learning about her uniue upbringing; regardless of what might think of the parenting she received she seems to have turned out very well It took great courage on her part to write such a personal revealing account of herself and her family; her strong voice is filled with conviction and passion Do not miss this one you will not regret reading it

  3. Zora O& Zora O& says:

    So lovely I know the woman who wrote this and it's about where I grew up so I'm a bit biased But still a thoughtfully written memoir of a father's and grandmother's death from Alzheimer's The backdrop happens to be Tinkertown the folk art museum the father Ross Ward built in the mountains outside Albuuerue It's shot through with great stories of Ross's vivid color life as an itinerant sign painter and not uite carny and a neat glimpse behind the scenes at the museum which is still open by the way

  4. Karen Karen says:

    For a reasonable admission price Goodman gives us a tour of the marvels contained within the relationship she has with her father Ross Ward He's a non conformist with a life long passion to create He channels his creativity into drawing painting sculptures and Although Goodman ends up telling about events throughout her lifespan and her father's this memoir is organized around his early onset dementia symptoms diagnosis progression through the disease and finally his passing This appearance of this devastating disease and his death all happen within just a few short years maybe about six years depending on pinpointing early symptoms in hindsight He's in his late 50s when his memory and his moods start to change for the worse This puts everyone around Ross into a tail spin His wife Carla his son Jason and his daughter Tanya Dementia changes everyone's relationships but because Tanya was living in California and trying to break into the screenwriting business she has to overtly decide how she will respond to his diagnosis She decides to move from LA to Tinkertown so that she can help her step mother and support her father I would hesitate to say this is a book about dementia because its about a number of things Carnivals museums family drama substance abuse blended families intergenerational connections and the unpredictability of life Ward has created a miniature city called Tinkertown He also has some collectibles and a gift shop He used to work the carnival circuit painting rides Ward spent years on the road and knows a number of carnies and a number of people who operate roadside attractions His museum is located in Sandia Park New Mexico north of Albuuerue Tanya includes a number of flashbacks to days when she went traveling with him on the road or watched him create a new item for his museum Her childhood was a bit zany but she conveys the details without any alarm about how exceptional this was It was part and parcel of living with Ross She clearly loves her father and learned how to roll with the opportunities of living with an impulsive creative driven person Despite all the challenges of such a childhood Goodman foregrounds the opportunities and the love among the cast of characters that are her family members Ross's father Grandma Rose gets a diagnosis of Alzheimer's around the same time as her son making for some interesting caregiving moments Carla has been Tanya's step mom since Carla was a teen but now these two women have to negotiate Ross's care as one adult woman working with another Jason Ross's tattoo artist son has been detached from his father for years but they have limited time to find a way to connect And in the wings are Tanya's boyfriend Jason's wife and a couple of women who work in the gift shop All are affected when Ross's dementia shakes things up The major themes that emerge are those that affect all family members whether or not they experience a health crisis Goodman just witnesses how dementia has a way of crystallizing family issues of trust loyalty love commitment communication affection memory and care

  5. Martha Stettinius Martha Stettinius says:

    Beautifully written and devastating in its detail “Leaving Tinkertown” is both a first rate father daughter love story and a testament to the particular heartbreak that is early onset Alzheimer’s disease The author’s father Ross is an eccentric but gentle and nurturing man who made his living in the West as a painter for carnivals Over the years Ross built a 22 room museum of miniature wooden scenes and figurines—Tinkertown—by adding rooms one by one to their farmhouse in New Mexico building the walls from glass bottles and cement The author Tanya grows up sharing her home with visitors from across the country When her father is diagnosed at age 58 with Alzheimer’s disease Tanya is barely scraping by in her late 20s in Los Angeles but doesn’t hesitate to come home leaving her sweetheart behind to help out her father who grows increasingly testy and stubborn and her high octane but emotionally removed step mother In “Leaving Tinkertown” Tanya artfully weaves scenes from her childhood with those from the present showing us how she continues to adore her father but struggles with the fears we so often have as caregivers—that she’ll forget who she is and what she wants for herself or be overcome by sadness She is angry that with his dementia her father “is leaving” and angry that she is “being left” Over time Tanya learns not only how to find her place as an adult in this strange and unpredictable household overcoming attacks of anxiety and self doubt but how to find her strength as a daughter and caregiver As a reader I came to feel a great fondness for both her and her father so it was difficult to witness his rapid descent into early onset Alzheimer’s As the daughter of a woman who suffered from dementia for over 10 years but declined slowly than Ross and passed away at 80 not in middle age I felt immense sorrow for Tanya that she lost her father so young Fortunately her story is beautifully wrought; with exuisite detail honesty and humor Tanya guides us gently from moment to moment in much the same way she learns to guide her father through the movements of his day I highly recommend this book for any reader not just those who have a loved one with dementia Ross Tanya and the special place that is Tinkertown will stay with you long after you finish the last page author Inside the Dementia Epidemic A Daughter's Memoir

  6. Karen Karen says:

    I don't know where I learned about this book I just did and it stayed on its line in my booklist until it was at the top then I acuired itThe story pops off the page The writing is fresh the metaphors are lovely and the characters oh the characters As I read it I had to keep reminding myself that this book is real; this is not fiction This man Ross who is at the center of this story created a world and lived in it true to himself As so beautifully stated in this book he brought family with him to Tinkertown The vivid images allow a peek into the rooms and the writing allows the reader into everyday life It's natural to say how sad and what a tragedy when hearing that someone has Alzheimer's disease Tanya Ward Goodman has made a beautiful story and memory out of her family's tragedy Well worth reading We never know when it can happen in our family Look across the front seat of the car at the person there Him? Her? Looking forward to books from this writer

  7. Madge Madge says:

    I have read Tanya's stories on the Next Family for years and was waiting for her book to arrive on the shelves Leaving Tinkertown reads like a fine circus with all the attending characters I fell in love with her family and was taken on a personal journey when her dad gets early onset Alzheimer's and she leaves her life temporarily to drive home to take care of him Her depictions of her mom step mom brother and father all tell an amazing story and you long to visit Tinkertown to catch a glimpse of this eccentric and uirky cast of characters The writing is a taste of a family's journey

  8. Roberta King Roberta King says:

    This was a lovely and tender story about a woman and her father as he succumbs to Alzheimer's disease Her father is an artist a character by all measures both in her childhood and adulthood The story moves between present and past giving the reader a view of what makes their bond so strong It also has one of the strongest stepmother characters I've read in a long time

  9. Bobbi Rosenquist Bobbi Rosenquist says:

    A wonderfully written tribute to a father being lost to Alzheimers Written accross the backdrop of Tinkertown a roadside attraction in New Mexico detailing a uniue upbringing by an extraordinary family So moving

  10. Mills College Library Mills College Library says:

    616831 G6538 2013

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