How to Read a Poem and Fall in Love with Poetry PDF ´


How to Read a Poem and Fall in Love with Poetry [Epub] ➟ How to Read a Poem and Fall in Love with Poetry ➤ Edward Hirsch – Buyprobolan50.co.uk Read a poem to yourself in the middle of the night Turn on a single lamp and read it while you're alone in an otherwise dark room or while someone sleeps next to you Say it over to yourself in a place Read a poem to Read a PDF Ì yourself in the middle of the night Turn on a single lamp and read it while you're alone in an otherwise dark room or while someone sleeps next to you Say it over to yourself in a place where silence reigns and the din of culture—the constant buzzing noise that surrounds you—has momentarily stopped This poem How to ePUB ´ has come from a great distance to find you So begins this astonishing book by one of our leading poets and critics In an unprecedented exploration of the genre Hirsch writes about what poetry is why it matters and how we can open up our imaginations so that its message—which is of vital importance in day to day life—can reach us to read a Kindle Õ and make a difference For Hirsch poetry is not just a part of life it is life and expresses like no other art our most sublime emotions In a marvelous reading of world poetry including verse by such poets as Wallace Stevens Elizabeth Bishop Pablo Neruda William Wordsworth Sylvia Plath Charles Baudelaire and many Hirsch to read a Poem and PDF/EPUB ² discovers the meaning of their words to read a Poem and PDF/EPUB ² and ideas and brings their sublime message home into our hearts A masterful work by a master poet this brilliant summation of poetry and human nature will speak to all readers who long to place poetry in their lives but don't know how to read it.

  • Kindle Edition
  • 374 pages
  • How to Read a Poem and Fall in Love with Poetry
  • Edward Hirsch
  • English
  • 26 April 2016

About the Author: Edward Hirsch

Edward Hirsch is a Read a PDF Ì celebrated poet and peerless advocate for poetry He was born in Chicago in —his accent makes it impossible for him to hide his origins—and educated at Grinnell College and the University of Pennsylvania where he received a PhD in Folklore His devotion to poetry is lifelongHe has received numerous awards and fellowships including a MacArthur Fellowship How to ePUB ´ a Guggenheim Fe.



10 thoughts on “How to Read a Poem and Fall in Love with Poetry

  1. Harper Curtis Harper Curtis says:

    Poetry needs readers Readers need Edward HirschHow to Read a Poem is simply the best book to read to learn about poetry generally and to stoke your passion for it It's an exuberant book which introduces readers to poetry joyfullyToo often readers learn the rules of verse for example that a sonnet has fourteen lines and rhymes a certain way but they're not inspired they don't know why they should care and they don't understand why anyone would bother to write a sonnet As a result they may memorize those rules but never want to read a sonnet again The inspiration they need is right here in How to Read a Poem This is the only book you need along with the Reading List offered at the back which will send you off to the library to explore for a lifetime

  2. Edita Edita says:

    The poet is incited to create a work that can outdistance time and surmount distance that can bridge the gulf — the chasm — between people otherwise unknown to each other It can survive changes of language and in language changes in social norms and customs the ravages of history The reader completes the poem in the process bringing to it his or her own past experiences You are reading poetry — I mean really reading it—when you feel encountered and changed by a poem when you feel its seismic vibrations the sounding of your depthsWe discover in poetry that we are participating in something which cannot be explained or apprehended by reason or understanding alone We participate in the imaginary We create a space for fantasy we enter our dream life dream time We deepen our breathing our mindfulness to being our spiritual alertnessPoetry is an animating force It comes alive when the poet magically inscribes a wave and thereby creates a new thing when the text immobilizes it when the individual poem becomes part of the great sea when the bottle washes ashore and the wanderer happens upon it when the reader experiences its inexhaustible depths

  3. Philip Gordon Philip Gordon says:

    I found this book and Hirsch as a result to be completely insufferable I don't know how it's possible to make someone with an unparalleled affection for poetry resent their chosen subject but Hirsch came damn close to doing it Almost every chapter and every paragraph therein in this book is sickening overly academic gushing blathering over inflated pompous dissection Even in the instances in which Hirsch selected poems I already knew and appreciated his slathering stripping down of everything in the material and going on at SUCH lengths about how AMAZING the poems were left a sour taste in my mouth and had me doubting my own preferences in poetry if they aligned with hisI am no stranger to close reading I love being analytical and intellectual but Hirsch in my opinion takes these ideas too far It should not take twenty pages to tell us why any one poem is worth reading; and what's I don't feel like this book taught me one iota of what it mentions in the title Am I to believe that in leading by example parading about his overblown affected enthusiasm for the moments in which poetry has touched him Hirsch is teaching me how to do anything? There's nothing touched on in terms of the actual act of reading the mechanics the processes the engagement with the text beyond Hirsch's stilted explicating of it In short I feel I would have learned simply googling the subject in uestion and being told to 'look for sound devices' in a given stanza rather than read Hirsch going on for multiple paragraphs about the sublime power of a single punctuation mark in one poem yes that really happensIn short this book felt to me like the antithesis of poety Kudos to people who have enjoyed it and further poetry subseuently as a result but I found it sickening and am left worrying about whether young minds seeking an introduction to an already challenging subject might have a potential lifelong interest uashed forever in the same way I almost did

  4. Garnette Garnette says:

    Edward Hirsch once spoke at a Poetry Therapy conference in Washington DC compassionately brilliantly and I made up my mind to add him to my favorite contemporary poets This book confirms my in person listening I must have fifty bookmarks in my library copy here there's wisdom on every page First example in writing about Walt Whitman's Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking It is one sentence and twenty two lines long It carries me away wrote Hirsch in chapter called 'Message in a Bottle' Then he continues The incantatory power of this poem is tremendous as the repetitions loosen the intellect for reverie All this about an ocean wave I am carried away with the beauty of both Whitman and Hirsch as they both intended and that's just on page 22It's about time in my life to be reminded of all the poetry writing and appreciation classes I once took Decades later I know the players always glad to savor them again at the Dodge Festival no longer happening or on Bill Moyer's Journal Yet reading Hirsch's book is a complete course in itself No lectures but digging deeply into the works and results of a poem This book could be a delight to anyone who can still read American English As opposed to alphabet words which I admit serve their purposes on the go Here are some uotes to treasure'Dramatize dramatize' Frost directed the poet and Akhmatova takes the clue here in spades p126Speaking of Auden and James Merrill's epic trilogy To bring forth figures to speak from the otherworld is inevitably to enter into the range and territory of the Divine Comedy p141 This book is a solace to writer's struggling to reinvent writing Hirsch seems to say you are not alone your ancestors in literature are benedictions to you should you turn and look their wayYeah I loved this book And now have to actually return it to the library after four renewals so will perforce buy my own For the Glossary subtitled The Pleasure of the Text which is a uick course in literary machinations For the world's poets in A Reading List and the Pleasure of the Catalog For the Index which is a precis of the book plus page numbers I am going to stop this praise and order two copies now

  5. Carrie Carrie says:

    I read this one trying to undo the damage of my high school english teacher Mission partly accomplished The first 7 chapters were helpful the last five were a little tedious I love that people get excited about poetry but sometimes that excitement turns into a club where only those in the know can understand

  6. Maiko-chan [|] Maiko-chan [|] says:

    fav uotesWe discover in poetry that we are participating in something which cannot be explained or apprehended by reason or understanding alone We participate in the imaginary We create a space for fantasy we enter our dream life dream time We deepen our breathing our mindfulness to being our spiritual alertnessPoetry is an animating force It comes alive when the poet magically inscribes a wave and thereby creates a new thing when the text immobilizes it when the individual poem becomes part of the great sea when the bottle washes ashore and the wanderer happens upon it when the reader experiences its inexhaustible depthsPoetry alerts us to what is deepest in ourselves it arouses a spiritual desire which it also gratifies It attains what it avows But it can only do so with the reader's imaginative collaboration and even complicity The writer creates through words a felt world which only the reader can vivify and internalize Writing is embodiment Reading is contactWe live in a superficial media driven culture that often seems uncomfortable with ture depths of feeling Indeed it seems as if our culture has become increasingly intolerant of that acute sorrow that intense mental anguish and deep remorse which may be defined as grief We want to medicate such sorrow away We want to divide it into recognizable stages so that grief can be labeled tamed and put behind us But poets have always celebrated grief as one of the deepest human emotions To grieve is to lament to let sorrow inhabit one's very beingLove crops up so often in lyric poetry because it is the soul's primary way of going out to another of freeing itself through another from the pressures and distractions of ordinary existence It is the soul's preferred mode of attainmentNotes the book technically ends at 63% with the following glossary lasting to 85%

  7. Sherry Elmer Sherry Elmer says:

    I really enjoyed this book I love Ed Hirsch's enthusiasm and his love and knowledge of his subject I appreciated his insights into familiar poems and his introduction to poets I hadn't read before This book also has the benefit of an excellent glossary I realize that these days anyone can look words up on Wikipedia or other on line places but it is great to have this reference all in one place Not to mention any book with a good recommended reading list gets extra credit from me

  8. Laysee Laysee says:

    In reading “How to Read a Poem And Fall in Love with Poetry” my soul went to school for several months and was deeply nourished About six years ago I was introduced to the poems of Edward Hirsch and was enchanted by them This time round I experienced Hirsch as a poetry teacher par excellence I am awed both by the brilliance of his poetic gift and the lyrical lucidity of his literary analyses Hirsch wrote lyrically and passionately about poetry which made reading this volume intensely and intimately pleasurable Savoring a lyrical treatise of a lyric poem was like adding honey to molasses This heightened delight repeats itself many times over for several pieces of literary commentary I especially appreciate Hirsch’s perspective of a poem as a literary archway that connects the poet and the reader One of my favorite metaphors is the poem as a message in a bottle sent out in the hope it could wash up on land and find its way to its reader Hirsch said it well Reading poetry is a way of connecting through the medium of language deeply with yourself even as you connect deeply with another Reading poetry is being immersed as Hirsch put it in soul culture a communion with other human beings There were many moments in his literary expositions that were very touching One was Hirsch as a child stumbling on Emily Bronte's “Night” a poem that expressed the grief he felt when his grandfather was dying He reflected I will always be grateful to her for delivering up the wild moors inside me for giving me my childhood grieving through her bardic craft The other was how reading elegies allowed him to come to terms with the loss of a good male friend Poetry opened up a space in him that made it possible to name what he felt as an outsize emotion There were also deliriously beautiful analyses of love poetry with abundant illustrations of how love poetry rejoiced in extravagant analogies eg the Song of Songs In contrast an analysis that was unbearably incisive was his chilling commentary on “Edge” a poem written by Sylvia Plath a week before her suicide One great benefit I derived was being introduced to many poets I have never previously read A few have become new favorites Elizabeth Bishop Pablo Neruda and Anna Akhmatova There is a wonderful glossary behind this volume where one can uickly look up a literary term There is also a comprehensive list of all the great poems that one would be poorer for not reading What a priceless literary treasure this volume is In sum Edward Hirsch has awakened me to “the Shock the Swoon the Bliss” of writing and reading poetry Many of the poets referenced in this volume have long departed but they have left behind them a lyrical gift that is deep and indestructible And for this I am immensely grateful

  9. Eileen Eileen says:

    I loved this book It was very rewarding to read I love books about other people's process and Hirsch delves into those processes with great care and delicacy He reads poetry from a great depth and with a huge heart plants that depth and heart on the page and makes it part of your own world Made me fall in love with all kinds of things I was not even aware of I'm likely to read this one again

  10. Rosemary Rosemary says:

    This book takes time and concentration best absorbed in small doses but what a read The title says it all One does fall in love with poetry Our book group is discussing it this weekend each bringing our list of the best 10 how impossible is that? When one chooses it is interesting to find that so many of them are ones you have studied in the past or were part of your childhood

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