[PDF / Epub] ★ Framing the Early Middle Ages By Chris Wickham – Buyprobolan50.co.uk



10 thoughts on “Framing the Early Middle Ages

  1. says:

    This book is a huge accomplishment and a genuinely impressive work of scholarship It s quite dense to read at points though Wickham does admirably in making what could be a chore rather engaging , but Wickham s sturdy and methodical scholarship are really pretty wonderful and he does a great job in painting the former Roman Empire plus Denmark and Ireland from 400 800 as taxation systems simplified or disappeared , aristocracies markedly decreased in their wealth and consequently their buy This book is a huge accomplishment and a genuinely impressive work of scholarship It s quite dense to read at points though Wickham does admirably in making what could be a chore rather engaging , but Wickham s sturdy and methodical scholarship are really pretty wonderful and he does a great job in painting the former Roman Empire plus Denmark and Ireland from 400 800 as taxation systems simplified or disappeared , aristocracies markedly decreased in their wealth and consequently their buying power, generating a localization of systems of exchange and militarized in their culture, and peasants often became increasingly autonomous For Wickham, the world didn t end with the fall of Rome but it did change in substantial ways.One possible caveat to this book is one that Wickham openly acknowledges it s an economic history through and through, and potential...


  2. says:

    Revised 4 29 12 After having read The Inheritance of Rome Illuminating the Dark Ages, 400 1000 by Chris Wickham, that is now my number one referral for people who want an introduction THIS book is for people who want to knowdetail Publication of books for the general public about the transition from the Roman world to the European world from about 400AD to about 800AD, aka Late Antiquity, Early Medieval, Dark Ages has been growing rapidly, reflecting a huge development over the past Revised 4 29 12 After having read The Inheritance of Rome Illuminating the Dark Ages, 400 1000 by Chris Wickham, that is now my number one referral for people who want an introduction THIS book is for people who want to knowdetail Publication of books for the general public about the transition from the Roman world to the European world from about 400AD to about 800AD, aka Late Antiquity, Early Medieval, Dark Ages has been growing rapidly, reflecting a huge development over the past 30 years.Chris Wickham s thesis is that this period is characterized by increasing regionalism and loss of an overall unifying political, cultural and social structure He says that earlier European h...


  3. says:

    This wasof a project than a book It s massive and detailed, not for a general reader see Wickham s The Inheritance of Rome for that It s also hard to know how to rate, but I am giving it 5 stars for usefulness, clarity and for accomplishing the author s stated goals With its broad focus, this would be an excellent book for someone looking for thesis topics or a research area The early Middle Ages really cries out forstudy and excavation.Wickham wants to provide a synthesis of d This wasof a project than a book It s massive and detailed, not for a general reader see Wickham s The Inheritance of Rome for that It s also hard to know how to rate, but I am giving it 5 stars for usefulness, clarity and for accomplishing the author s stated goals With its broad focus, this would be an excellent b...


  4. says:

    Weighing in atthan 800 pages of text andthan 100 of bibliography, Framing of the Middle Ages is worthy of the name tome Chris Wickham examines a variety of regions in Western Europe, North Africa and Western Asia which were part of the Roman Empire together with Denmark and Ireland as non Roman comparatives between roughly 400 and 800, looking primarily at the political and economic transformations which occurred in the Empire s aftermath He uses both documentary and archaeolog Weighing in atthan 800 pages of text andthan 100 of bibliography, Framing of the Middle Ages is worthy of the name tome Chris Wickham examines a variety of regions in Western Europe, North Africa and Western Asia which were part of the Roman Empire together with Denmark and Ireland as non Roman comparatives between roughly 400 and 800, looking primarily at the political and eco...


  5. says:

    Long, boring book about stuff that happened so long ago we aren t sure if it did The author stresses the unique, internally driven development of each region he discusses, and wishes to move analysis away from teleological or nationalistic readings of evidence In the conclusion he states that the early middle ages was 1 a period in which fiscal structures were nearly universally simpler then they had been before, 2 a period of relative aristocratic weakness marked by 3autonomous pea Long, boring book about stuff that happened so long ago we aren t sure if it did The author stresses the unique, internally driven development of each region he discusses, and wishes to move analysis away from teleological or nationalistic readings of evidence In the conclusion he states that the early middle ages was 1 a period in which fiscal structures were nearly universally simpler then they had been before, 2 a period of relative aristocratic weakness marked by 3autonomous peasantries, 4 a period in which aristocracies changed substantially in their culture and identity ancestry became temporarily less important nearly everywhere, 5divergent the end of Roman unity, and 6 a time of notable social fluidity.Near the end the author questions the validity of the statement It is thus rigorously true to say that, without Mahomet, Charlemagne is inconceivable He would replace that popular sound bite of history with the less appealing exchange complexity in the early medieval period was a...


  6. says:

    Not for the casual reader, but if you want a deep dive into the transition from late antiquity to the early middle ages, you will love this Incorporates archaeological evidence and deep historiographical knowledge to present a nuanced, insightful survey of the period.


  7. says:

    An impressive overview of the exchange networks in other words, the big ticket economies, if you will of the late Roman and post Roman worlds This book brings together a lot of disparate information, and if you read it along with Michael McCormick s Origins of the European Economy you end up with a pretty comprehensive overview of the current state of early Medieval economic history This book has a fair amount of social history too, though very little cultural history And it s definitel An impressive overview of the exchange networks in other words, the big ticket economies, if you will of the late Roman and post Roman worlds This book brings together a lot of disparate information, an...


  8. says:

    A massive synthesis of documentary history, archaeology and historiography produced since Pirenne s famous thesis established the dominant view of post Roman transformation of the mediterranean and western Europe This book sets out a...


  9. says:

    So far so good, but I ve barely begun It is a mammoth tome, and I will do well if I get through it this summer It is introducing me to areas of the early middle ages that I hadn t considered before specifically North Africa, Egypt and Palestine It s time I extended my thinking b...


  10. says:

    will be the death of me.


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Framing the Early Middle Ages The Roman Empire Tends To Be Seen As A Whole Whereas The Early Middle Ages Tends To Be Seen As A Collection Of Regional Histories, Roughly Corresponding To The Land Areas Of Modern Nation States As A Result, Early Medieval History Is Much Fragmented, And There Have Been Few Convincing Syntheses Of Socio Economic Change In The Post Roman World Since The 1930s In Recent Decades, The Rise Of Early Medieval Archaeology Has Also Transformed Our Source Base, But This Has Not Been Adequately Integrated Into Analyses Of Documentary History In Almost Any Country.In Framing The Early Middle Ages Chris Wickham Aims At Integrating Documentary And Archaeological Evidence Together, And Also, Above All, At Creating A Comparative History Of The Period 400 800, By Means Of Systematic Comparative Analyses Of Each Of The Regions Of The Latest Roman And Immediately Post Roman World, From Denmark To Egypt Only The Slav Areas Are Left Out The Book Concentrates On Classic Socio Economic Themes, State Finance, The Wealth And Identity Of The Aristocracy, Estate Management, Peasant Society, Rural Settlement, Cities, And Exchange These Are Only A Partial Picture Of The Period, But They Are Intended As A Framing For Other Developments, Without Which Those Other Developments Cannot Be Properly Understood.Wickham Argues That Only A Complex Comparative Analysis Can Act As The Basis For A Wider Synthesis Whilst Earlier Syntheses Have Taken The Development Of A Single Region As Typical , With Divergent Developments Presented As Exceptions, This Book Takes All Different Developments As Typical, And Aims To Construct A Synthesis Based On A Better Understanding Of Difference And The Reasons For It This Is The Most Ambitious And Original Survey Of The Period Ever Written.