Don't Look Now MOBI ï Don't Look MOBI :º

Don't Look Now [Read] ➯ Don't Look Now Author Daphne du Maurier – Buyprobolan50.co.uk The title novella of this collection features John and Laura who are on holiday in Venice But it is a dangerous place for them as they are being followed by two old sisters and there is a killer on th The title novella of this collection features John and Laura who are on holiday in Venice But it is a dangerous place for them as they are being followed by two old sisters and there is a killer on the loose.


About the Author: Daphne du Maurier

If Daphne du Maurier had written only Rebecca, she would still be one of the great shapers of popular culture and the modern imagination Few writers have createdmagical and mysterious places than Jamaica Inn and Manderley, buildings invested with a rich character that gives them a memorable life of their ownIn many ways the life of Daphne du Maurier resembles a fairy tale Born into a family with a rich artistic and historical background, the daughter of a famous actor manager, she was indulged as a child and grew up Don't Look MOBI :º enjoying enormous freedom from financial and parental restraint She spent her youth sailing boats, travelling on the Continent with friends, and writing stories A prestigious publishing house accepted her first novel when she was in her early twenties, and its publication brought her not only fame but the attentions of a handsome soldier, Major later Lieutenant General Sir Frederick Browning, whom she marriedHer subsequent novels became bestsellers, earning her enormous wealth and fame While Alfred Hitchcock s film based upon her novel proceeded to make her one of the best known authors in the world, she enjoyed the life of a fairy princess in a mansion in Cornwall called Menabilly, which served as the model for Manderley in RebeccaDaphne du Maurier was obsessed with the past She intensively researched the lives of Francis and Anthony Bacon, the history of Cornwall, the Regency period, and nineteenth century France and England Above all, however, she was obsessed with her own family history, which she chronicled in Gerald A Portrait, a biography of her father The du Mauriers, a study of her family which focused on her grandfather, George du Maurier, the novelist and illustrator for Punch The Glassblowers, a novel based upon the lives of her du Maurier ancestors and Growing Pains, an autobiography that ignores nearly years of her life in favour of the joyful andromantic period of her youth Daphne du Maurier can best be understood in terms of her remarkable and paradoxical family, the ghosts which haunted her life and fictionWhile contemporary writers were dealing critically with such subjects as the war, alienation, religion, poverty, Marxism, psychology and art, and experimenting with new techniques such as the stream of consciousness, du Maurier produced old fashioned novels with straightforward narratives that appealed to a popular audience s love of fantasy, adventure, sexuality and mystery At an early age, she recognised that her readership was comprised principally of women, and she cultivated their loyal following through several decades by embodying their desires and dreams in her novels and short storiesIn some of her novels, however, she went beyond the technique of the formulaic romance to achieve a powerful psychological realism reflecting her intense feelings about her father, and to a lesser degree, her mother This vision, which underlies Julius, Rebecca and The Parasites, is that of an author overwhelmed by the memory of her father s commanding presence In Julius and The Parasites, for example, she introduces the image of a domineering but deadly father and the daring subject of incestIn Rebecca, on the other hand, du Maurier fuses psychological realism with a sophisticated version of the Cinderella story The nameless heroine has been saved from a life of drudgery by marrying a handsome, wealthy aristocrat, but unlike the Prince in Cinderella, Maxim de Winter is old enough to be the narrator s father The narrator thus must do battle with The Other Woman the dead Rebecca and her witch like surrogate, Mrs Danvers to win the love of her husband and father figure.



10 thoughts on “Don't Look Now

  1. Glenn Russell Glenn Russell says:

    Gripping, absolutely gripping my listening to three Daphne du Maurier tales on audio No Motive and two from this collection, Don t Look Now and the author s famous The Birds Each reading spanning an hour and a half, the storytelling so compelling, picking up dramatic momentum every single minute, I dare not take a break until the shocking conclusion And to add a bitatmosphere to my listening to The Birds, out my apartment window, down at the pond, a gaggle of Canadian Geese started ho Gripping, absolutely gripping my listening to three Daphne du Maurier tales on audio No Motive and two from this collection, Don t Look Now and the author s famous The Birds Each reading spanning an hour and a half, the storytelling so compelling, picking up dramatic momentum every single minute, I dare not take a break until the shocking conclusion And to add a bitatmosphere to my listening to The Birds, out my apartment window, down at the pond, a gaggle of Canadian Geese started honking and fighting and honking somePatrick McGrath writes in his astute Introduction to this New York Review Books NYRBedition how Daphne du Mauier possessed an uncanny genius to craft her stories in ways to sustain tension right up until the the final sentence, an ending frequently shocking and disturbing in the extreme I enjoyed each of the nine pieces collected here but two most especially Don t Look Now with its clairvoyant older twins and creepy happenings and the story serving as the focus of my review The Birds And please don t think of the Hitchcock film other than attacking birds and terrorized humans, Daphne du Maurier s tale is a hundred shades darker, incomparablyominous and threatening, even to the point of impending cataclysm for the entire human race THE BIRDS Black and white, jackdaw and gull, mingled in strange partnership, seeking some sort of liberation, never satisfied, never still Flocks of starlings, rustling like silk, flew to fresh pasture, driven by the same necessity of movement, and the smaller birds, the finches and the larks, scattered from tree to hedge as if compelled Handyman Nat Hocken lives in remote farming country out on a peninsula in England and remarks to one of the farmers how there s something quite strange about all the bird behavior this autumn Just how strange Nat finds out very quickly when that very night birds enter the bedroom window of his son and daughter, dozens of little birds, attacking both of them, trying to peck out his son s eyes Nat takes immediate action, gets his children out of the room, closes the door, and frantically swings a pillow left and right, up and down, to kill as many birds as he can The next morning Nat gazed at the little corpses, shocked and horrified They were all small birds, none of any size, there must have been fifty of them lying there upon the floor There were robins, finches, sparrows, blue tits, larks, and bramblings, birds that by nature s law kept to their own flock and their own territory, and now, joining one with another in their urge for battle, has destroyed themselves against the bedroom walls, or in the strife had been destroyed by him And this is only the beginning Later that day Ned is attacked by bigger birds out in a field and, after he races home for protection, both he and his wife hear on the radio that the government of England has called a state of emergency, advising all citizens to remain inside and take the necessary precautions to ensure their safety But, above all else, people are urged to remain calm Time Out for Facts there exists almost ten thousand different species of birds and according to some experts, the total worldwide bird population could total as many as four hundred billion Whoa Four hundred billion No matter how you look at it, that s a lot of birds Imagine what would happen if, as if directed and coordinated by some unseen unifying force, all those birds began an attack en masse on humans Slovenian philosopher and cultural critic Slavoj i ek believes the author was targeting the prevailing welfare state for their inability to effectively deal with the attacking birds Patrick McGrath notes how du Maurier s story anticipates a global ecological disaster I myself think McGrath is on the mark and i ek is way off the mark As Nat Hocken asserts, survival, at least immediate survival, has everything to do with the sturdiness of one s shelter Sorry, Slavoj politicians of any stripe will be of little help in fending off a nonstop attack conducted by billions of birds Daphne du Maurier delves into the unsettling psychology produced by such an attack Almost to be expected, initial reactions revolve around denial and rationalization Very understandable since the cycle of human existence is completely dependent on the laws of nature And thewe understand the laws of nature, thewe feel we are in control Herein lies the terror of the tale the laws of nature remain intact with one glaring exception the behavior of the birds All of a sudden nature has transformed itself into the unknown As writers such as H.P Lovecraft recognized, there is no stronger human emotion than fear and no great fear than fear of the unknown As per the well worn admonition, Don t just stand there, do something humans being humans, there is a natural instinct to take action Upon hearing a roaring sound, Nat reflects how the authorities have sent out airplanes but knows this is sheer suicide since aircraft would be useless against thousands and thousands of birds flinging themselves to death against propellers, fuselages and jets Then Nat hears another sound, a sound prompting him to have one last smoke The hawks ignored the windows They concentrated their attack upon the door Nat listened to the tearing sound of splintered wood, and wondered how many million years of memory were stored in those little brains, behind the stabbing beaks, the piercing eyes, now giving them this instinct to destroy mankind with all the precision of machines Did I mention gripping I can assure you, you will never encounter achilling, spellbinding, mesmerizing tale then this one Darn, down at the pond, those Canadian Geese are still honking up a storm But no attacks on humans have been reportedyet


  2. mark monday mark monday says:

    Daphne du Maurier takes a dip into the deep and murky waters of the human condition What did she find there Certainly not treasure Egos punctured and hopes shattered, mysteries solved but in the worst way, the soul turned into a commodity, the wrecks of dreams and desires just another day at the beach for the chilly and not particularly empathetic Ms du Maurier, who is all too familiar with humanity s constant ability to fool itself.The talent on display reminded me of both Ruth Rendell a Daphne du Maurier takes a dip into the deep and murky waters of the human condition What did she find there Certainly not treasure Egos punctured and hopes shattered, mysteries solved but in the worst way, the soul turned into a commodity, the wrecks of dreams and desires just another day at the beach for the chilly and not particularly empathetic Ms du Maurier, who is all too familiar with humanity s constant ability to fool itself.The talent on display reminded me of both Ruth Rendell and Joyce Carol Oates All three authors share the ability to effortlessly create characters that are recognizable and rooted in our reality, while maintaining a dispassionate detachment from those characters Cold blooded writers, writing about mainly unsympathetic people Perhaps not a fun experience but there was certainly much to admire Her prose is elegant her characters are unpleasant but interesting her themes are darkly fascinating her disinterest in spelling things out and thus keeping her stories ambiguous is admirable.The most famous of the collection, its title story Don t Look Now about an ill fated holiday in Venice was certainly disturbing and memorable And bleak Not After Midnight had a strain of weird fantasy that made it all thehaunting And bleak A Border Line Case pulls double duty as a mystery and an anti romance the story was continually tense And bleak The Breakthrough could have been a mournful exploration of things spiritual and material, but du Maurier s cold eye made the story feellike a cautionary tale both desolate and eerie And bleak.My favorite was actually the most broadly comic The Way of the Cross This scabrous farce details the trials and tribulations of a small tour group in Jerusalem A miniature Ship of Fools Nearly every character gets their very personalized and often quite cruel comeuppance except for an ingenious child, who miraculously escapes punishment but give him time The worst, most excruciating embarrassment was surprisingly reserved for the irritable Reverend Babcock, forced to lead this band of snobs and hypocrites and liars Poor Reverend I actually thought du Maurier would leave him unscathed Possibly because I saw myself in him, haha But du Maurier makes it clear that a Reverend should not see himself as above his flock, even if he is in charge of a flock of assholes Anyway, I laughed a lot in this story, I laughed until I choked


  3. Steven Godin Steven Godin says:

    Having seen the 1973 film adaptation of Don t Look Now many years ago which completely freaked me out, I thought this would somewhat take the gloss off the reading experience simply because it contained one of the most shocking finales in history, but thankfully I needn t have worried Although the other four short stories in this collection are every bit as chilling it s Don t Look Now that stands out from the rest as a terrifying masterpiece of slow burning tension, which is spine chilling Having seen the 1973 film adaptation of Don t Look Now many years ago which completely freaked me out, I thought this would somewhat take the gloss off the reading experience simply because it contained one of the most shocking finales in history, but thankfully I needn t have worried Although the other four short stories in this collection are every bit as chilling it s Don t Look Now that stands out from the rest as a terrifying masterpiece of slow burning tension, which is spine chilling as hell but also tender and intimate, a perfect distillation of the confusion and desire that attend grief for a married couple, which, as the story progresses, adventures forward through the winding streets of Venice with the logic of a nightmare After the death of their daughter Venice to degree becomes a sort of haven for the healing process, well that s until a seriously creepy old psychic clairvoyant predicts some rather disturbing happenings This is in essence a haunting ghost story which looks at the close affinity of a loving couple and the emotional reactions of losing a child And it s here I will stop for reasons of not giving too much away All the stories are, in their own way, refusals of comfort with the one thing in common being that unpleasant things happen to people, and in one way or another, there is little chance of escapism, Du Maurier certainly knows how to hold ones attention, you may know what s coming but not necessarily in the direction that is anticipated and that s a strong attribute to have.You could be settled into the most comfy chair on the planet, but once she starts to weave her web of unnerving horror, just don t expect to stay that way


  4. Barry Pierce Barry Pierce says:

    The first three stories in this collection Don t Look Now, Not After Midnight, and A Border Line Case are absolutely wonderful They re very atmospheric and, at times, chilling I d recommend this whole collection on those stories alone However, it s the final two works The Way of the Cross and The Breakthrough that really let down this collection and thus rob it of a four star rating They re two bland stories that don t really offer much and only exist to disappoint.


  5. Chris M.H Chris M.H says:

    Quite the collection of thrillers Not only did these short stories take me on a metaphysical haunted theme park ride but I took pleasure in travelling alongside true power of imagination and awe.The ideas behind most of these stories express themselves as very fresh and intelligent, especially the first Don t look now the second Not after Midnight and the last The Breakthrough , being surprisingly complex for short stories I thoroughly enjoyed reading these with the total confusion and di Quite the collection of thrillers Not only did these short stories take me on a metaphysical haunted theme park ride but I took pleasure in travelling alongside true power of imagination and awe.The ideas behind most of these stories express themselves as very fresh and intelligent, especially the first Don t look now the second Not after Midnight and the last The Breakthrough , being surprisingly complex for short stories I thoroughly enjoyed reading these with the total confusion and dire end of the first story, the serene setting but interminable tension build leading to eventual horror of the second and the completely insane actions of the last keeping me hooked throughout.I rate du Maurier s novels highly for all the reasons stated above and , and these stories are equal to those that I ve read, even, perhaps offering increasingly creepier thrills to the reader


  6. Bam cooks the books ;-) Bam cooks the books ;-) says:

    Happy Short Story Month May, 2017 This is a collection of five short stories by Daphne du Maurier Don t Look Now, The Breakthrough, Not After Midnight, A Border Line Case, The Way of the Cross which exhibit the great versatility and inventiveness of the author The topics vary from psychic precognition, to scientific experimentation, to possible murder, to incest, and finally to various forms of public humiliation atonement for sins All were interesting but I found some of the endings a b Happy Short Story Month May, 2017 This is a collection of five short stories by Daphne du Maurier Don t Look Now, The Breakthrough, Not After Midnight, A Border Line Case, The Way of the Cross which exhibit the great versatility and inventiveness of the author The topics vary from psychic precognition, to scientific experimentation, to possible murder, to incest, and finally to various forms of public humiliation atonement for sins All were interesting but I found some of the endings a bit disappointing All in all worth reading but I have to say I appreciate du Maurier s full length novels


  7. Lotte Lotte says:

    An interesting collection full of stories of subtle and in some cases, not so subtle horror and suspense My favourite was definitely the title story, Don t Look Now, and sadly, some stories didn t really work for me, hence the 3 star rating.


  8. David David says:

    Daphne Du Maurier is very British And I am very not Her language leaves me at a cool, unengaged distance, mostly which clearly isn t desirable for the kind of fiction she traffics in i.e., horror, basically, but of acerebral variety Two of the stories in this collection The Birds and Don t Look Now have been adapted into films by Alfred Hitchcock and Nicholas Roeg, respectively In the former case, Du Maurier s story easily outshines Hitchcock s goofy, overlong film and is certa Daphne Du Maurier is very British And I am very not Her language leaves me at a cool, unengaged distance, mostly which clearly isn t desirable for the kind of fiction she traffics in i.e., horror, basically, but of acerebral variety Two of the stories in this collection The Birds and Don t Look Now have been adapted into films by Alfred Hitchcock and Nicholas Roeg, respectively In the former case, Du Maurier s story easily outshines Hitchcock s goofy, overlong film and is certainly the best and perhaps only truly visceral story in the collection and in the latter case well, let s just say neither the film nor the story is terribly successful And in the film there s a distressing amount of Donald Sutherland nudity And any amount of Donald Sutherland nudity is, as you might well guess, a distressing amount I ve read these stories over a month, and I can t remember many of them I can t make up my mind whether to blame this on my memory or Du Maurier s failure as a writer, but either way I m probably being too generous by giving this three stars Yeah, just look at me being all generous And you thought I was an asshole


  9. Andrew Andrew says:

    This is part of my treasured Folio collection and its a cracker The book collects Daphne du Maurier s macabre stories together which span her writing career The book contains several famous short stories which I am sure have beensuccinctly and creatively reviewed than I could have achieved plus I do not give spoilers.I think the only exception would be the Birds the last story in this collected edition and one which was the basis of Hitchcocks classic The reason why I focus on this one This is part of my treasured Folio collection and its a cracker The book collects Daphne du Maurier s macabre stories together which span her writing career The book contains several famous short stories which I am sure have beensuccinctly and creatively reviewed than I could have achieved plus I do not give spoilers.I think the only exception would be the Birds the last story in this collected edition and one which was the basis of Hitchcocks classic The reason why I focus on this one is that I can be a littlelenient with my no spoilers since I am sure everything has either heard or seen the film plus I had a rather strange experience this morning which brought the story in to focus.I long thought that the scene in the film with the crows in the play ground was a little contrived stay with me you will get there as it was well know that Hitchcock would not mind bending a few rules if it meant a better cinematic experience Well I thought that the way the birds sounded and acted was a little false.that was till this morning when outside the house where there is a very large tree a large number of crows started to form and yes they sounded exactly like that I later found out they were hounding a Red Kite which was circling but still it did bring that school house scene to mind.And so I set about reading the stories and considering the book was 300 pages plus I forgot how east it was to get drawn in to her work.Enough to say that the story from this book is farpowerful and harrowing by the simplicity of which Ms du Maurier describes the events It is times like these that remind me that re reading a book sometimes can be evenstriking that reading it for the first time


  10. Mike Mike says:

    I d be hard pressed to identify weak links in this collection Indiscretion is light and fun, but maybe doesn t pack as much of a wallop as the author intended the last and longest story, Monte Verita , is a bit obvious and sentimental, but still ambitious and different Other than that, I really enjoyed theselet s call them uncanny stories, most of which are fairly dark and perverse not quite, say, Paul Bowles level dark and perverse, but with a real gratifyingly sharp edge to them, jus I d be hard pressed to identify weak links in this collection Indiscretion is light and fun, but maybe doesn t pack as much of a wallop as the author intended the last and longest story, Monte Verita , is a bit obvious and sentimental, but still ambitious and different Other than that, I really enjoyed theselet s call them uncanny stories, most of which are fairly dark and perverse not quite, say, Paul Bowles level dark and perverse, but with a real gratifyingly sharp edge to them, just as sharp aswell, let s not spoil anything.It s a pretty much unanimous opinion here on GR that Don t Look Now and The Birds stand out from the rest, and I can t help but agree these are probably two of the best short stories I ve ever read The former is at least as good as the movie, which is saying something, and The Birds is excellent as well no, not just excellent, but unique, and rich enough to be interpreted about 37 different ways much better than Hitchcock s adaptation, in my opinion His story is almost entirely different, and one element that he omitted unless I didn t notice it was the explicit parallel that Daphne du Maurier 1907 1989 draws between the attack of the birds and the Blitz The birds are Nazis, actually, it seems to me Nat listened to the tearing sound of splintering wood, and wondered how many million years of memory were stored in those little brains, behind the stabbing beaks, the piercing eyes, now giving them this instinct to destroy mankind with all the deft precision of machines.In fact, a theme that runs throughout these stories, at least as I read them, is that the war experience in England has somehow altered the nature of reality Birds are no longer what they were, and neither are peopleeither that, or they ve been revealed as what they were all along In The Blue Lenses , for example, a woman whose vision is restored suddenly sees everyone around her as an animal including a high number of vultures In Kiss Me Again, Stranger , a disturbed woman recalls growing up in shelters, her parents home having been bombed during the Blitz And in the subtle and eerie Escort , a British ship stalked by a German submarine is guided to safety by an old British crewa very old British crew.My favorite to least favorite 1 Don t Look Now2 The Birds3 Kiss Me Again, Stranger4 Escort5 The Blue Lenses6 A Split Second7 Indiscretion8 La Sainte Vierge9 Monte Verita The 2020 version of du Maurier s classic, by the way, would be called The Drones


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