O Primo Basílio MOBI ¾ O Primo PDF/EPUB or

O Primo Basílio [PDF / Epub] ✅ O Primo Basílio By Eça de Queirós – Buyprobolan50.co.uk Dedalus European ClassicsCousin Bazilio is a tale of sexual folly and hypocrisy and vividly depicts bourgeois life in 19th century Lisbon Sauciness and scandal come as part of the enticing package in Dedalus European ClassicsCousin Bazilio is a tale of sexual folly and hypocrisy and vividly depicts bourgeois life in th century Lisbon Sauciness and scandal come O Primo PDF/EPUB or as part of the enticing package in this European classic by Portugal's most celebrated th century writer Cousin Bazilio might not be his best work but it certainly drew the most attention when it was originally published for all the wrong reasons;specifically deceitful lusts a series of characters some aristocratic hedonistic socialites others colourful aspiring servants but all connected by a string of naughty secrets The tale rips along at a pace that could outdo any modern soap while the social realist side of de ueiroz shows up the hypocritical limitations laid down by society particularly on female morality A classic then but distinctly alternative in every way The Scotsman.


10 thoughts on “O Primo Basílio

  1. Luís Luís says:

    I fell in love with this 19th century Portuguese novel a souvenir novel from my stay in Porto Having never read Portuguese literature classical or contemporary at the time of this reading I was delighted to take this opportunityLuiza is a young bourgeois who allows herself to seduced by her youthful love her cousin Bazilio The latter is a dandy who wants to have a good time while he's in Lisbon I uote this love story was pleasant and fascinating because it couldn't be complete There was a little adultery a little incest This event sets the tone but it is not over there is still the servant Juliana frustrated and humiliated by her condition who dreams of greatness and hates her mistressesThis novel promised a tragic story of adultery and blackmail even promised a little too much since the back cover spoils the end of the book We therefore know that the novel will end badly but fortunately the suspense and the tension have affected mainly me and held in anticipationWe find in this novel everything that makes the classics the careful writing psychology studied in depth but with the modernity of tone and rhythm that made me devour itMy only regret is the end maybe a little too easy unveil the hidden textThanks to the omniscient narration the novel is very dynamic the tension rises and falls according to the chapters We know Luiza's state of mind we can guess that of Bazilio and Juliana's intentions are very clear how far will this take us?Juliana is a compelling character We hate her for what she feels for Luiza and makes her suffer while understanding her terrible frustration especially since in a sense it's a way of fighting social injusticeI loved immersing myself in this novel and its atmosphere It is a superb surprise that I recommend to all


  2. Sonia Gomes Sonia Gomes says:

    Eca de ueiroz introduced Realismo in Portugal What a pleasant breakfast Luísa stretched her arms indolently; she could see Jorge watching her cleavage where her robe had fallen open Jorge liked her looks although not beautiful in a conventional way her masses of beautiful brown hair and her wide brown eyes were good to look at her curvaceous figure was delicious add to it a pleasant nature and Luísa was what every man would dream and want in a wifeBut Luísa was bored her day yawned before her what to do? How to get the day to move faster? Go to the milliner she had dozens of hats of every hue Dresses by the dozens to match her numerous hats A visit to the dressmaker was really unnecessary Library that again tedious she had read piles of those milk and water romances they were turning to be oh so predictable The lovers most of them from noble families feigning dislike for each other only to marry ultimately The settings always opulent the situations decadent tea parties balls hunts everything catered for a life of hedonism which only royalty and nobility could afford Luísa smiled when had she gone for a hunt those novels were a far cry from her life As for sex the novels ignored it sex just did not happen if the couples so much as exchanged a kiss that was bold Now what Luísa really liked were her conversations with her friend Leopoldina that woman was something dozens of lovers and such erotic stories You make me blush Leopoldina no no how can one do such things Angel my angel Leopoldina would laugh with a superior air born of experience and knowledge Of course Luísa had to pretend that such eroticism scandalised her horrified her but they both knew that was a façade of course Luísa had to pretend not to like those racy stories act as though sex was not for her didn’t you know a Lady of Society never likes sex? Just grins and bears it Come now we know better who in their right mind can resist sex?And then one fine day in conversation with that stick in the mud Sebastião Jorge decides that she Luísa was not to talk to Leopoldina any was to stop her from visiting a total embargo on Leopoldina In their opinion Leopoldina was destroying her innocence Luísa had no problems if her innocence was in tatters she wanted her so called ‘purity’ to be sullied to be besmirched she was a full blooded woman purity my foot Of course Jorge wanted her to be the perfect demure wife but what Luísa really wanted was excitement romance and most of all to experience what Leopoldina did oh yes that was a thrilling prospect Vaguely she heard Jorge blabbing oh how he would miss her he said Jorge was going on a field trip Luísa would miss him too but she knew that Jorge would not be sad for too long he would find women he would have his flingsShe breathed in deeply and then a snippet in the corner of the newspaper caught her eye Her cousin Basilio was visiting the country She was excited went red and warm remembering those moments of awakening when Basilio visited her so often and they would go on those long long walks stealing kisses and caresses whilst Mama had little naps Oh how she had loved Basilio loved him intensely with all the passion of a young girl And then all of a sudden he had gone away to make his fortune Had he really made his fortune? Would he visit her? Suddenly her day did not seem endless in fact it seemed shorter and she had so much to do Of course Basilio would visit her; he could never resist a woman besides he already knew her those walks those luscious kisses all under Mama’s very nose He was sure she had turned delectable a red plum waiting to be picked Basilio thought of women as fruit to be nurtured to be picked when ripe and savoured Visit her he did and was not surprised that she was not at all averse to his attentions she was coy flirted with him and yes as Basilio had foreseen she was ready to fall in his arms much like a ripe peachOn suggesting that they rent a room for privacy Luísa never balks never even bats an eyelid oh to experience everything that Leopoldina was talking about She imagines the setting for the idyll to be congenial opulent perhaps but to her surprise it is just a shabby little room in a derelict area Despite the sadness of the room the affair continuesAlthough Luísa has to travel a long distance to get to the shabby little room which now seems home she does not pull back She is feverish at the thought of not meeting Basilio Even when Juliana the wretched servant catches hold of some of Luísa’s letters and blackmails her Luísa hangs on to the sordid liaison Despite the fact that Luísa now realises that to Basilio she is just a toy he is not even courteous treats her badly but she hangs in thereJorge prolongs his stay; he is away for so long that we wonder does he have a relationship of his own?Then Jorge returns and Basilio flies the coop it’s too murky a situation for Basilio why tangle with Jorge anyway there were no surprises to be had from Luísa he was done with herThings go from bad to worse for Luísa; her guilt weighs on her so heavily that she falls ill Just when she is about to recover Jorge shows her a letter that Basilio has written accuses her but Luísa so traumatised falls apart never recovers and dies of an unnamed illnessNow uestions arise Why did Eça de ueiroz who was writing a novel of realism ‘kill’ Luísa? What was he afraid of? Did he want to show that the sin of ‘adultery’ in a woman can never be forgiven can never be condoned a woman can never go scot free; so did Eça punish Luísa by killing her?Or was Eça afraid of a much devastating situation was he terrified that women would begin to like their sexual freedom? Had Luísa lived would she have taken lovers much like the wanton Leopoldina? Did he fear was that he had created a monster much like Frankenstein which he did not know how to rein in?Oh Eça you opened a can of worms which was very difficult to close


  3. David David says:

    Want to read a book on the life of the rich in Lisbon in the 1830s? A young woman Luisa is married to an older engineer Jorge She leads what seems a charming life They have everything a nice house a governess a cook and lots of friends They go to the opera play music on the piano and gossip She loves to read romance novels as a distraction But is she happy?Ah minha rica senhora how nice to have a lover? Even better a Brasilian lover? Your husband is away on business and all those romance novels play into your boredom Your cousin returns from Brasil He has been in love with you since childhood You meet in his little house called Paradise You feel guilty and off to church you go Is she happy now? Yes until the governess steals a love letter and blackmails Luisa Basílio laughs it off and leaves town for Paris fearing a scandal and bored of Lisbon And then her husband returns Her life falls apart as she placates the governess doing her work in the house The husband is upset and asks the maid to leave but Luisa fearing the governess will tell everything to the husband starts to crackLuisa asks her husband’s best friend Basílio for help In doing so things get “worse” leading to the culmination of the storySo one must ask who is to blame? A bored housewife Luisa cheated on her husband Basílio lead her on with his charms Her best friend encouraged her into this romance because her husband was absent Her husband seemed interested in work Her husband’s best friend kept secrets The selfish maid who saw all but greed brought her to crime She was jealous of everything Louisa had The neighbor who feared a scandal was brewing but told no one That is a lot of finger pointing This book asks a lot of uestionsPortuguese high class society had rules and in breaking them they had conseuences Luisa suffered those conseuences After the conclusion of this book there is a letter written to a friend by Eça explaining his motives Following in the footsteps of the great French writers like Balzac Hugo and Flaubert there is nothing like social commentary Portugal has their own social commentator Eça de ueirós And I am grateful for that


  4. Kathryn Kathryn says:

    This is a flaubertian style novel by the Portuguese canonical Eça de ueirós though ueirós has humor and wit than Flaubert It's a great 19th century read


  5. Bob Newman Bob Newman says:

    A is for Adultery B is for BlackmailA So you know this dandified dude comes back to Portugal from Brazil and looks up an old flame She’s his cousin How bad is that? He’s a practiced and proficient seducer and on the surface has beautiful manners and of course a bit of dough to spread around He snares her though she’s happily married Hubby is away on an extended trip to the provinces Nowadays given Portugal’s size he could easily have driven home on the weekends But this is in the 1860s OK so the dame is weak but she’s passionate He manipulates her shamelessly She has two female servants at home and a lot of neighbors who are Olympic level sticky beaks Due to these latter they wind up freuenting a rather crummy love nest downtown but the dude slowly tires of her On top of that one of the servant women a very sneaky unpleasant lot purloins a few love letters that have passed between the duo She starts getting ideas mainly “pay up or I tell hubby all”B Things get serious The dude splits for Paris with no ualms at all Ah well he has to leave this nice piece behind but hey there are better ones in Paris That’s about the depth of his feeling Where were Mike Hammer Miguel Martelo? and Sam Spade when we really needed them? Nowhere man The blackmailing servant rides rampant the poor woman is beside herself hubby returns things start to go downhill The harsh voiced malignant servant overdoes it and what happens? Hey you’ve gotta read this one I don’t think the general theme of this book is that interesting to those of us who have seen a zillion movies and telenovelas and read any number of romantic tales in our wasted youth However though I’ve written up this review sort of tongue in cheek I should say that Eça de ueirós broke through standard over drawn romances to provide readers with a very realistic portrait of both adultery and blackmail; he drew characters that jump off the pages and will no doubt live forever in Portuguese literature Their words their behavior their various uirks and failings their friendships and sincereinsincere advice are most believable He has a good handle on human nature As usual the author doesn’t fail to point out the sad condition of the country back then I’ve given it four stars for these reasons not because the story itself will thrill anyone


  6. Monica Monica says:

    The way that Margaret Jull Costa translated this novel so that it sounds modern made not only the change from Portuguese to English easy but also the change in language from 1878 to 2016 easy In the book where almost no one is lovable the story and narration carries us through the characters mistakes and forces us to watch the characters disgusting personality traits Bazilio himself talks about raping his cousin and then complains that there is no soda water at a restaurant saying 'this country is vile' I love the hypocrisy and satire of this novel and I always look out for Margaret's translated works


  7. Daniela S. Daniela S. says:

    Muito mais entusiasmante do ue Os MaiasIt was enjoyable than Os Maias The Maias


  8. Fábio Shecaira Fábio Shecaira says:

    Machado de Assis Brazil’s most notable novelist did not like Eça’s book Machado wrote that the characters were insipid with the exception of Juliana the housemaid the plot contrived and the language crude and sensual I or less agree with Machado’s first two criticisms although I think he could have acknowledged the book as a humorous satire of the Portuguese bourgeoisie My main disagreement pertains to the point about style Machado’s critiue of Eça’s rough “realism” sounds prudish to me Indeed it is the directness and explicitness of Eça’s prose that makes some scenes so compelling including that in which Jorge discovers that he has been betrayed The detailed description of his feelings—a confusion of anger fear lust and compassion—is an example of Realism at its best


  9. Sótis Sótis says:

    I've read this book to a Literature homework and it surprised me The writing is fluid the characters are charismatics little space to say that I'm in love for Jorge and besides the book is a realist work we found many elements of the naturalism which in my opinion make it better Totally recommended


  10. Sonia Gomes Sonia Gomes says:

    What a pleasant breakfast Luísa stretched her arms indolently; she could see Jorge watching her cleavage where her robe had fallen open Jorge liked her looks although not beautiful in a conventional way her masses of beautiful brown hair and her wide brown eyes were good to look at her curvaceous figure was delicious add to it a pleasant nature and Luísa was what every man would dream and want in a wifeBut Luísa was bored her day yawned before her what to do? How to get the day to move faster? Go to the milliner she had dozens of hats of every hue Dresses by the dozens to match her numerous hats A visit to the dressmaker was really unnecessary Library that again tedious she had read piles of those milk and water romances they were turning to be oh so predictable The lovers most of them from noble families feigning dislike for each other only to marry ultimately The settings always opulent the situations decadent tea parties balls hunts everything catered for a life of hedonism which only royalty and nobility could afford Luísa smiled when had she gone for a hunt those novels were a far cry from her life As for sex the novels ignored it sex just did not happen if the couples so much as exchanged a kiss that was bold Now what Luísa really liked were her conversations with her friend Leopoldina that woman was something dozens of lovers and such erotic stories You make me blush Leopoldina no no how can one do such things Angel my angel Leopoldina would laugh with a superior air born of experience and knowledge Of course Luísa had to pretend that such eroticism scandalised her horrified her but they both knew that was a façade of course Luísa had to pretend not to like those racy stories act as though sex was not for her didn’t you know a Lady of Society never likes sex? Just grins and bears it Come now we know better who in their right mind can resist sex?And then one fine day in conversation with that stick in the mud Sebastião Jorge decides that she Luísa was not to talk to Leopoldina any was to stop her from visiting a total embargo on Leopoldina In their opinion Leopoldina was destroying her innocence Luísa had no problems if her innocence was in tatters she wanted her so called ‘purity’ to be sullied to be besmirched she was a full blooded woman purity my foot Of course Jorge wanted her to be the perfect demure wife but what Luísa really wanted was excitement romance and most of all to experience what Leopoldina did oh yes that was a thrilling prospect Vaguely she heard Jorge blabbing oh how he would miss her Jorge was going on a field trip Luísa would miss him too but she knew that Jorge would not be sad for too long he would find women he would have his flingsShe breathed in deeply and then a snippet in the corner of the newspaper caught her eye Her cousin Basilio was visiting the country She was excited went red and warm remembering those moments of awakening when Basilio visited her so often and they would go on those long long walks stealing kisses and caresses whilst Mama had little naps Oh how she had loved Basilio loved him intensely with all the passion of a young girl And then all of a sudden he had gone away to make his fortune Had he really made his fortune? Would he visit her? Suddenly her day did not seem endless in fact it seemed shorter and she had so much to do Of course Basilio would visit her; he could never resist a woman besides he already knew her those walks those luscious kisses all under Mama’s very nose He was sure she had turned delectable a red plum waiting to be picked Basilio thought of women as fruit to be nurtured to be picked when ripe and savoured Visit her he did and was not surprised that she was not at all averse to his attentions she was coy flirted with him and yes as Basilio had foreseen she was ready to fall in his arms much like a ripe peachOn suggesting that they rent a room for privacy Luísa never balks never even bats an eyelid oh to experience everything that Leopoldina was talking about She imagines the setting for the idyll to be congenial opulent perhaps but to her surprise it is just a shabby little room in a derelict area Despite the sadness of the room the affair continuesAlthough Luísa has to travel a long distance to get to the shabby little room which now seems home she does not pull back She is feverish at the thought of not meeting Basilio Even when Juliana the wretched servant catches hold of some of Luísa’s letters and blackmails her Luísa hangs on to the sordid liaison Despite the fact that Luísa now realises that to Basilio she is just a toy he is not even courteous treats her badly but she hangs in thereJorge prolongs his stay; he is away for so long that we wonder does he have a relationship of his own?Then Jorge returns and Basilio flies the coop it’s too murky a situation for Basilio why tangle with Jorge anyway there were no surprises to be had from Luísa he was done with herThings go from bad to worse for Luísa; her guilt weighs on her so heavily that she falls ill Just when she is about to recover Jorge shows her a letter that Basilio has written accuses her but Luísa so traumatised falls apart never recovers and dies of an unnamed illnessNow uestions arise Why did Eça de ueiroz who was writing a novel of realism ‘kill’ Luísa? What was he afraid of? Did he want to show that the sin of ‘adultery’ in a woman can never be forgiven can never be condoned a woman can never go scot free; so did Eça punish Luísa by killing her?Or was Eça afraid of a much devastating situation was he terrified that women would begin to like their sexual freedom? Had Luísa lived would she have taken lovers much like the wanton Leopoldina? Did he fear was that he had created a monster much like Frankenstein which he did not know how to rein in?Oh Eça you opened a can of worms which was very difficult to close


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *