Los Planetas PDF/EPUB º Paperback

Los Planetas ➜ [KINDLE] ❆ Los Planetas By Sergio Chejfec ➦ – Buyprobolan50.co.uk When he reads about a mysterious explosion in the distant countryside the narrator’s thoughts turn to his disappeared childhood friend M who was abducted from his home years ago during a spasm of po When he reads about a mysterious explosion in the distant countryside the narrator’s thoughts turn to his disappeared childhood friend M who was abducted from his home years ago during a spasm of political violence in Buenos Aires in the early s He convinces himself that M must have died in this explosion and he begins to tell the story of their friendship through a series interconnected vignettes hoping in this way to reanimate his friend and relive the time they spent together wandering the streets of Buenos AiresSergio Chejfec’s The Planets is an affecting and innovative exploration of mourning remembrance and friendship by one of Argentina’s modern masters.


10 thoughts on “Los Planetas

  1. Stephen Stephen says:

    Both of Chejfec's books that have been translated into English The Planets and My Two Worlds have proven themselves somewhat difficult to get through Not because Chejfec is a difficult writer per se nor because I find them exhausting but there is resistance in his prose that I liken to someone inviting you in but keeping his foot against the door This seems a deliberate choice on Chejfec's part and it works his works demand that rare valuable thing from a reader strict concentration That concentration is paid off in full in Chejfec's brilliant moments which shine through often enough to leave one feeling a little at a loss as if the words on the page suddenly fleetingly became something substantial and true


  2. João Reis João Reis says:

    A good book about friendship identity and political violence and terror Sometimes it drags too much and I would prefer a bit action and less introspection and a bit of humor too So overall it's a uite boring book Excellent translation


  3. Christopher Robinson Christopher Robinson says:

    Exuisite start to finish Seriously some of the finest writing on memory and loss I’ve ever had the pleasure of reading The Planets was my first Sergio Chejfec and most certainly will not be my last I’m blown away This one will stick with me for a very very long time


  4. Madeleine Madeleine says:

    Uneven ultimately — parts of it are lovely deeply felt and engaging and parts are not failing alternately for being too vague or too explicit Too many connections are explained which should have been left to intuit and too much time is spent talking about silence when some actual silence would have sufficed I'm left with the suspicion that this book isn't uite about what Chejfec thinks it's about that the Sebaldian meditations on identity memory and the city are ultimately weightless and beside the point I like Chejfec's style and I look forward to reading his future books but I wish that he would stop trying to write like Sebald and write like himself He's a surprisingly good storyteller this was something I never managed to realize in My Two Worlds and a better storyteller than philosopher The existential conclusions the book draws are disappointingly obvious and do not explain the book as if the book itself were a planet that could not see the star it was orbiting PS I won my copy of this book through a GoodReads giveaway so would like to thank Open Letter for that and for their general fabulousness


  5. Jacob Wren Jacob Wren says:

    Sergio Chejfec writesNeither of us would have imagined that years later these events would be written down on paper If we had foreseen this we would have acted differently guiding our steps according to our idea of posterity; fortunately we did not This foreseeing should be clarified however given that if M knew the reasons why I would end up writing these pages he certainly would have done what was needed to avoid his abduction though in fact he did nothing at all to cause it They say that one could avoid innumerable problems mistakes and catastrophes if one knew how things were going to turn out but this is an impossible dream The most extreme example of this is that we are all certain of death – and even expanding things a bit about the decline of civilization the destruction of the environment and the inevitable ostracism of the sun – but are still unable to avoid the end What keeps us from losing hope in the fact of this inescapable truth? A belief in the interim in the fact that in the meantime things happen that are worth experiencing


  6. Chad Post Chad Post says:

    DISCLAIMER I am the publisher of the book and thus spent approximately two years reading and editing and working on it So take my review with a grain of salt or the understanding that I am deeply invested in this text and know it uite well Also I would really appreciate it if you would purchase this book since it would benefit Open Letter directlyNot really as tight as My Two Worlds but maybe emotionally gripping I love Heather Cleary's translation and all the little stories that the narrator recounts from his childhood friend especially the one about the eye and the railroad tracks I hope that sounds intriguing It's kind of hard to review our own books on here but I just want to say that I'm extremely proud that we took a chance on Sergio and signed on three of his books way back when He's a fantastic writer and one whose reputation will surely grow as people encounter him and books become available


  7. Will Will says:

    A surprisingly moving story of mourning written in a meandering dense philosophical style that touches on political religious and social themes with lots of ideas about how humans interact with space around them both in terms of geographic space especially in how humans construct and are constructed by cities Captives of geography our past is shaped by the city and in terms of outer space Because the same mystery that moves the planets also impels people And it has to be noted that Heather Cleary's translation is remarkable the style of this book is daunting and can seem impenetrable but her rendering gives a beautiful rhythm within the long sentences and chunky paragraphsA great book I'd recommend reading Chejfec's My Two Worlds before reading The Planets it is a tightly composed narrative that can get you inside Chejfec's amazing head a little easier


  8. Andy Andy says:

    Very definitely not a book to be rushed through It demands to be mulled over slowly Very digressive and meditative I found it to have much the same conceptual content as a lot of the poetry I've been reading lately


  9. Tara Tara says:

    I won’t pretend to completely understand everything that is going on in The Planets Despite that I can appreciate that with its publication by Open Letter Books Sergio Chejfec has presented English readers with a gentle novel on friendship grief and loss It is ostensibly a collection of memories told to us by the narrator about his childhood friend M M was abducted during Argentina’s Dirty War He disappeared his fate unknown leaving his friends and family in a kind of limbo Sergio Chejfec has stated that the book is in part based on a real life friend who did disappear in the 1970′s Some years later the narrator reads in the newspaper about an explosion outside of Buenos Aires He believes for no good reason and without evidence as far as I can see that M was killed in it What he has come to see as confirmation of M’s death unleashes the flood of memories which make up The Planets Eventually leading him to some kind of closureMemories are not bound by the law of causality linear space or time And so we are forced to follow the disorganized train of the narrator’s thoughts Interspersed between the memories of M are other related memories – an encounter the narrator has with his and M’s mutual friend meeting M’s mother after the abduction stories told to him by M and M’s father It becomes tricky keeping track This meandering stream of conscious style was also present in My Two Worlds but the geography of the park in which that narrator walked provided a structure Structure which I badly missed in The Planets at least in the early chapters Coming to terms with the lack of a lineal storytelling is a hurdle that has to be overcome in order to appreciate this novelLike The Catcher in the Rye The Planets is obliuely about grief Like Salinger Chejfec plays this information close to the chest He engulfs you in his narrator’s subconscious leaving you to experience first hand the strange distance combined with an eery connection that exists between the person lost and the other left Holden Caulfield mentions his dead brother briefly in passing but his loneliness informs every line of the novel The narrator of The Planets has assembled a montage of memories yet his connection to M he eventually acknowledges is stretching and becoming tenuous To confuse matters his memories of M are mixed with fictional stories he’s come to associate with the friendship Some of those stories are split into parts appearing at random intervals through the course of the book It’s often difficult to distinguish between fact and fiction but the experience of the narrator attempting to hold on to his grief and through the emotion of grief his friend is recognizable and feels real in its very ambiguity Heather Cleary the translator has done a remarkable job of capturing what she refers to as a “certain – productive – dissonance” in the textA highlight of The Planets which is foremost a novel of ideas is the narrator’s explanation of how the static existence or non existence of M created by his disappearance and the mystery of his fate has changed the orbits the two young men once traveled in relation to each other Chejfec continuously references space gravity stars and the planets The ongoing metaphor that he’s created is startling because it is so beautifulSergio Chejfec seems to have an attachment to the cosmos as demonstrated by his choice of titles My Two Worlds The Planets and the upcoming The Dark seem too pointed to be coincidental As of his books are translated into English perhaps the significance if one exists will come to light Which segues nicely into why I find Chejfec’s writing interesting and exciting There’s so much there to explore These aren’t books to be uickly consumed and just as uickly forgotten The Planets will linger frustrate and engage – demanding you return to it to fully understood and appreciate its many layers for example I haven’t even touched on the political aspect of the wartime setting This is what I like best about Sergio Chejfec’s novels – like the great classics of literature they live and grow with the reader As such they are never finished


  10. Julianne (Outlandish Lit) Julianne (Outlandish Lit) says:

    A very strange and surreal book I don't really know how to explain the plot so I'll let the publisher do it for me When he reads about a mysterious explosion in the distant countryside the narrator’s thoughts turn to his disappeared childhood friend M who was abducted from his home years ago during a spasm of political violence in Buenos Aires in the early 1970s He convinces himself that M must have died in this explosion and he begins to tell the story of their friendship through a series interconnected vignettes hoping in this way to reanimate his friend and relive the time they spent together wandering the streets of Buenos AiresOk that sounds about right But this book isn't so much about the politics in Buenos Aires This book is about memory friendship and loss The narrator goes over many different segmented memories of himself and his time with his friend M The book meanders around sharply focusing on certain instances for a while then tumbles right into a new memory I was tugged about by the narrator's thoughts not by any real chronology The unconventional structure was difficult at first but it sort of parallels how memories really areThe Planets was definitely a slow read but I do believe that it was worth it Sometimes I would get so wrapped up in the strange stories told about M or told by M with no apparent connection to any reality that I wouldn't be able to stop thinking about them for the rest of the day They seem hard to tie together as you're reading them but taking the time to concentrate while reading definitely becomes worth it by the end The narrator comes clearly into focus time starts to align and we essentially see the impact of M's disappearance I almost gave up on the book at the beginning but I'm glad that I didn'tIf you have the time to slowly read and you don't mind a bit of philosophizing I think this book is worth a shot Especially if you have weird hang ups aboutinterest in memory Like I do Full review


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