Deaths of the Poets Epub Õ Deaths of Kindle -

Deaths of the Poets ➹ Deaths of the Poets Free ➯ Author Michael Symmons Roberts – Buyprobolan50.co.uk From Chatterton’s Pre Raphaelite demise to Keats’ death warrant in a smudge of arterial blood; from Dylan Thomas’s eighteen straight whiskies to Sylvia Plath’s desperate suicide in the gas ove From Chatterton’s Pre Raphaelite demise to Keats’ death warrant in a smudge of arterial blood; from Dylan Thomas’s eighteen straight whiskies to Sylvia Plath’s desperate suicide in the gas oven of her Primrose Hill kitchen or John Berryman’s leap from a bridge onto the frozen Mississippi the deaths of poets have often cast a backward Deaths of Kindle - shadow on their work The post Romantic myth of the dissolute drunken poet – exemplified by Thomas and made iconic by his death in New York – has fatally skewed the image of poets in our culture Novelists can be stable savvy politically adept and in control but poets should be melancholic doomed and self destructive Is this just a myth or is there some essential truth behind it that great poems only come when a poet's life is pushed right to an emotional knife edge of acceptability safety security What is the price of poetryIn this book two contemporary poets undertake a series of journeys – across Britain America and Europe – to the death places of poets of the past in part as pilgrims honouring inspirational writers but also as investigators interrogating the myth The result is a book that is in turn enlightening and provocative eye wateringly funny and powerfully moving.


10 thoughts on “Deaths of the Poets

  1. Bettie Bettie says:

    What is the cost of poetry? Must poets be melancholic doomed and self destructive? Or is this just a myth? In our new Book of the Week Michael Symmons Roberts and Paul Farley both award winning poets themselves explore that very uestion through a series of journeys across Britain America and EuropeFrom Sylvia Plath's desperate suicide in the gas oven of her Primrose Hill kitchen to John Berryman's leap from a bridge onto the frozen Mississippi the deaths of poets have often cast a backward shadow on their workThe post Romantic myth of the dissolute drunken poet has fatally skewed the image of poets in our culture Novelists can be stable savvy politically adept and in control but poets should be melancholic doomed and self destructive Is this just a myth or is there some essential truth behind it that great poems only come when a poet's life is pushed right to an emotional knife edge of acceptability safety security?A Portable Shrine Today the poets explore the lives and tragic deaths of Thomas Chatterton and Dylan ThomasThe Names of the Bridges the lives and suicides of John Berryman and Sylvia PlathPoet Interrupted the lives and deaths of Stevie Smith and Louis MacNeiceThe Burning of Some Idols he lives and reclusive deaths of Emily Dickinson and Rosemary TonksThe life and death of eccentric poet W H Auden


  2. Michael Reffold Michael Reffold says:

    A little repetitive in places and slightly uneven but intriguing for the most part and an introduction to some poets I have yet to check out


  3. Laura Laura says:

    FRom BBC Radio 4 Book of the weekWhat is the cost of poetry? Must poets be melancholic doomed and self destructive? Or is this just a myth? In our new Book of the Week Michael Symmons Roberts and Paul Farley both award winning poets themselves explore that very uestion through a series of journeys across Britain America and EuropeFrom Sylvia Plath's desperate suicide in the gas oven of her Primrose Hill kitchen to John Berryman's leap from a bridge onto the frozen Mississippi the deaths of poets have often cast a backward shadow on their workThe post Romantic myth of the dissolute drunken poet has fatally skewed the image of poets in our culture Novelists can be stable savvy politically adept and in control but poets should be melancholic doomed and self destructive Is this just a myth or is there some essential truth behind it that great poems only come when a poet's life is pushed right to an emotional knife edge of acceptability safety security?Today the poets explore the lives and tragic deaths of Thomas Chatterton and Dylan ThomasWritten and read by the authorsAbridged for radio by Lauris Morgan GriffithsProduced by Simon Richardsonhttpwwwbbccoukprogrammesb08dn2gj


  4. Siobhan Siobhan says:

    In Deaths of the Poets Paul Farley and Michael Symmons Roberts travel through the deaths of poets to consider the image of the poet as a dangerous vocation where mortality seems to be the price paid for creation They literally travel indeed around the death places of many major poets from Chatterton in the late eighteenth century to some who have died in the twenty first making the book part travelogue part literary history and part musing on being a poetIt is a morbid whistle stop tour in many ways with the chapters organised by theme and ‘theme’ is mostly related to their deaths and thus jumping across time and place particularly across the Atlantic They concentrate on famous British and American poets writing in English so their travelling features than its fair share of New York and a strange trip to my hometown thanks to John Clare The book is almost as a side effect a useful way of gaining some knowledge of a lot of famous poets from the past two hundred years in a concise wayMore than that the authors are trying to examine the image of the dying poet the post Chatterton post Romantic of a poet going out in an often troubled possibly drunken blaze They cover poets who famously died young—John Keats being high on the list also war poets and others—and those who actually lived out a fairly long life The answer to the uestion ‘is it a myth?’ is inconclusive by the end but it was never really a scientific endeavourAs with many books that cover a lot of different bits of literary history this one works well as a primer on the stories of a lot of big name poets with the opportunity for those who know about a writer to get frustrated at elements of their presentation It is a reminder of our fascination with the lives of these notable few and the almost mythical position they can hold in cultural consciousness without consideration of greater depth However maybe it needs to demythologise the figure of the poet a little As it points out they’re just people who lived and died like anyone else


  5. Yasmin Yasmin says:

    Some of it was alright and some of it not so much I think for myself that the authors were looking for the poets in all the wrong places I mean I see that they wanted to find the last vestiges of great men and a few women and they seemed to be in the final places they lived or drew breath But I think the best place to see and know where these fellow poets dwell is in the books that light up the imaginations of the reader Even if not too many young readers now turn to these poets and than some I hadn't even heard of and wouldn't consider as fantastic as these men think the poet remains with the reader I don't think they did justice to the lingering memory of Dylan Thomas Biographies are uneven territory I get that but even from his poems they were not fair to Dylan There were a few truly inspired writing in this book mostly spotty but a fairly descent read


  6. Sabeena Sabeena says:

    An extremely well written well worded and atmospheric account of these two poets' journey I don't have much prior knowledge about the poets they selectively wrote about but it was really easy for me to collateral research the poets as I read about them through the book while discovering their respective poemsworks along the way This is why it has taken me close to two months to read this book You will want to savour it slowlyFarley and Roberts know their stuff and the immense respect they have for the poets they explore is evident The writing reflects thisAnd what is it they are writing about? They have a 'central uestion'; why does being a Poet carry that heavy stigma of depression and untimely or tragic death?OK so this is uite a morbid subject to research but the writers have a clear plan and they deliver their discoveries in the form of a travel diary biography and memoir format all in one Lots of anecdotes and meeting people related to the poets they research interview excerpts and 'walks down memory lane' There is nothing morbid about their research other than perhaps the finer details of how each of the poets die well yes they have to talk about that tooThere are very interesting concepts which they reveal for example regarding the idea that poets are already 'framed posthumously' while they are alive archiving their work as they go along for the inevitability that will one day take placeThe idea of 'latent inhibition' that describes a filter the brain possesses to keep you from being overwhelmed by a massive amount of sensory information and how this filter is lifted in states of mental fragility allowing for new associations to be made Thus raising the uestion about whether poets tend to be mental fragile?You will be introduced to poets from Keats Plath and Berryman to Carlos Williams Byron Philip Larkin Elizabeth Bishop and others Their lifestyles their fascination with subjects like death in their poetry how they died and how that may have cast a shadow on the work they left behindThe authors conclude by saying that whether or not being a great poet is synonymous with being jinxed it seems that great poems need to be associated with dramatic themes like love death and raw nature For this the poet needs to have a heightened sensitivity to these subjects and that this may come to them with risks How else would they be able to reach those heights of emotions to write those 'great poems'?Immensely interesting book


  7. ra ra says:

    actual 35i read this on holiday and overall liked it a lot the subject matter is really interesting and the writers are good at picking uotes and anecdotes to highlight their points while also not completely undoing the poet’s legacy so i really appreciated that and ofc there were a couple lines that made me laugh exhale so kudos to themBUT heres the stuff that bothered me midway through i felt like they kinda justlost steam? there wasn’t a lot of direction to it they started to jump poets in each chapter without actually going in depthgiving any kind of background so if you dont know anything about some of these poets you will feel a little lostoverall though good read i enjoyed it given that it was my first literary non fiction and maybe i’ll pick up stuff in this genre?


  8. Marshall A Lewis Marshall A Lewis says:

    What a long and enjoyable read Not only am I a little familiar with a few poets' names I'm also a little learned on the lives and deaths of some of those poets I didn't take notes while I was reading and my memory is atrocious so I can't say any chapter or comment particularly sticks out than any of the others but I thoroughly enjoyed the entire book and will probably reread it in the future when I've read some of the poets they referred to Already an avid Micheal Symmons Roberts fan in excited to read some of Paul Farley and would love to read their other collaborative work


  9. Itch Iseatingnandos Itch Iseatingnandos says:

    The best book I read in 2019 Beautifully written by two poets and I learned a lot about my favourite dead poets Highly recommended I think I'll read it again


  10. Mike Toms Mike Toms says:

    I wasn't sure at first; as the initial chapters slipped by I was unsure if this was some form of ghoulish travel writing masuerading as an exploration of what drives some of us to write poetry But as the final days of pairs of dead poets were presented interwoven so some notion of what a poet is and what drives the poetic instinct came to the fore There is poignancy here a degree of social commentary and the touching insight into lives that were so often full of the ordinary domestic and routine


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