10 thoughts on “Ασκητική

  1. Jan Rice Jan Rice says:

    Since I have been recommending this book, it seemed like a good idea to read it.Some time ago my husband read a part of it to me, and it made a deep impression I ve been going around telling people it represents my theology, even though I hadn t read it And now that I have read it I still say the same Only it doesn t look like I thought In my mind s eye it was written in paragraphs in a book of prose Actually it slike poetry, and it s a list of numbered rules and regulations intertwin Since I have been recommending this book, it seemed like a good idea to read it.Some time ago my husband read a part of it to me, and it made a deep impression I ve been going around telling people it represents my theology, even though I hadn t read it And now that I have read it I still say the same Only it doesn t look like I thought In my mind s eye it was written in paragraphs in a book of prose Actually it slike poetry, and it s a list of numbered rules and regulations intertwined with narrative Kazantzakis says between two intervals of darkness we have a brief interval we call life How should we see it What are we supposed to do with it I m just going to include some of my favorite parts That s somewhat arbitrary, and I better watch out or I ll be copying the whole thing No need for that it s available online here From The Preparation Beyond the mind, on the edge of the heart s holy precipice, I proceed, trembling One foot grips the secure soil, the other gropes in the darkness above the abyss.Behind all appearances, I divine a struggling essence I want to merge with it.I feel that behind appearances this struggling essence is also striving to merge with my heart But the body stands between us and separates us The mind stands between us and separates us.What is my duty To shatter the body, to rush and merge with the Invisible To let the mind fall silent that I may hear the Invisible calling.I walk on the rim of the abyss, and I tremble.From The March I hear the savage cry, and I shudder The agony that ascends within me composes itself, for the first time, into an integral human voice it turns full face toward me and calls me clearly, with my own name, with the name of my father and my race.This is the moment of greatest crisis This is the signal for the March to begin If you do not hear this Cry tearing at your entrails, do not set out.Continue, with patience and submission, your sacred military service in the first, second, and third rank of preparation.And listen In sleep, in an act of love or of creation, in a proud and disinterested act of yours, or in a profound despairing silence, you may suddenly hear the Cry and set forth The Saviors of God is not conventional theology You are not my slave, nor a plaything in my hands You are not my friend, you are not my child You are my comrade in arms This is the part I heard a long time ago that I never forgot You are not one you are a body of troops, One of your faces lights up for a moment under the sun Then suddenly it vanishes, and another, a younger one, lights up behind you.The race of men from which you come is the huge body of the past, the present, and the future It is the face itself you are a passing expression You are the shadow it is the meat.You are not free Myriad invisible hands hold your hands and direct them, When you rise in anger, a great grandfather froths at your mouth when you make love, an ancestral caveman growls with lust when you sleep, tombs open in your memory till your skull brims with ghosts.Your skull is a pit of blood round which the shades of the dead gather in myriad flocks to drink of you and be revived Do not die that we may not die, the dead cry out within you We had no time to enjoy the women we desired be in time, sleep with them We had no time to turn our thoughts into deeds turn them into deeds We had no time to grasp and to crystallize the face of our hope make it firm Finish our work Finish our work All day and all night we come and go through your body, and we cry out No, we have not gone, we have not detached ourselves from you, we have not descended into the earth Deep in your entrails we continue the struggle Deliver us IT IS NOT enough to hear the tumult of ancestors within you It is not enough to feel them battling at the threshold of your mind All rush to clutch your warm brain and to climb onceinto the light of day.But you must choose with care whom to hurl down again into the chasms of your blood, and whom you shall permit to mount onceinto the light and the earth.Do not pity them Keep vigil over the bottomless gulf of your heart, and choose You shall say This shade is humble, dark, like a beast send him away This one is silent and flaming,living than I let him drink all my blood.More unconventional theology Our God is not almighty, he is not all holy, he is not certain that he will conquer, he is not certain that he will be conquered.And, for my last quote LIE IN AMBUSH behind appearances, patiently, and strive to subject them to laws Thus may you open up roads through chaos and help the spirit on its course.Impose order, the order of your brain, on the flowing anarchy of the world Incise your plan of battle clearly on the face of the abyss.Contend with the powers of nature, force them to the yoke of superior purpose Free that spirit which struggles within them and longs to mingle with that spirit which struggles within you.When a man fighting with chaos subdues a series of appearances to the laws of his mind and strictly confines these laws within the boundaries of reason, then the world breathes, the voices are ranged in order, the future becomes clarified, and all the dark and endless quantities of numbers are freed by submitting to mystical quality.With the help of our minds we compel matter to come with us We divert the direction of descending powers, we alter the course of the current, we transform slavery into freedom.We do not only free God by battling and subduing the visible world about us we also create God Open your eyes, God shouts I want to see Prick up your ears, I want to hear March in the front ranks you are my head In the print edition, there s a 40 page introduction by the translator about the philosophical influences Kazantzakis actual text, 90 pages, follows He started writing it in 1922, published in in 1927 He made some revisions up until 47 My edition is 1960 Parts of it will seem outdated He uses the masculine pronoun for God and says mankind, not humankind His view of women is not that of a feminist He s always talking about fathers and about begetting sons He uses terms like crusade innocently He uses some Christian metaphors, for that is his background but is not given to anti Judaism There are a few touches of socialism or communism In short, he s a person of his times I don t think I agree with his vision of two battling forces, one ascending and one descending Instead, one ascends, struggling and against tough resistance, with the difficulty being the absence of direction or of energy instead of an opposing force.One might say he s chiseled his little T torah out of the living rock of his tradition, and because of his skill he has tapped into universality, so the minor dated aspects don t keep his poetry and message from soaring


  2. Noor Ali Noor Ali says:

    This book is phenomenal and it s hard to write a review that can give it enough credit I have been looking for a book of this sort since I have read The Death of Ivan Ilyich I know both are VERY different from one another in so many levels, but at their core they share the same existential angst.Nikos existential questions about the matters of life, death and the purpose of humans existence through out the book, spoke to me on a personal level The written language is dazzling, and the pictu This book is phenomenal and it s hard to write a review that can give it enough credit I have been looking for a book of this sort since I have read The Death of Ivan Ilyich I know both are VERY different from one another in so many levels, but at their core they share the same existential angst.Nikos existential questions about the matters of life, death and the purpose of humans existence through out the book, spoke to me on a personal level The written language is dazzling, and the picture that the author tries to paint with each word and sentence is something to reflect on It s like Nikos has written his own holy book, which in my opinion is THE holy book that deserves to be read, reread and lived by, whether you are a believer or not.The translator did a great job delivering this book in a way I believe was better than the author could ever imagine or wish for.Reading this book was a pleasant surprise and I m glad I gave it the chance given my previous, not so great experience with the same author.Some of the hidden or not so hidden gems in this book it took me sheer willpower to not quote the entire book lol 1 We come from a dark abyss, we end in a dark abyss, and we call the luminous interval life 2 I am the worker of the abyss I am the spectator of the abyss I am both theory and practice I am the law Nothing beyond me exists 3 This is all a cruel and futile game, without beginning, without end, without meaning 4 I have one longing only to grasp what is hidden behind appearances, to ferret out thatmystery which brings me to birth and then kills me, to discover if behind the visible andunceasing stream of the world an invisible and immutable presence is hiding 5 Who plants us on this earth without asking ourpermission Who uproots us from this earth without asking our permission 6 I want to find a single justification that I may live and bear this dreadful daily spectacle ofdisease, of ugliness, of injustice, of death 7 I once set out from a dark point, the Womb, and now I proceed to another dark point,the Tomb A power hurls me out of the dark pit and another power drags me irrevocablytoward the dark pit 8 New generations tread on the corpses of their fathers, continue the workabove the abyss and struggle to tame the dread mystery How By cultivating a single field,by kissing a woman, by studying a stone, an animal, an idea 9 Where do we come from Where are we going What is the meaning of this life That iswhat every heart is shouting, what every head is asking as it beats on chaos


  3. Eleni Eleni says:

    Nikos Kazantzakis is easily in my top 3 authors of all time andAsceticismtranslated asSaviors Of Godin English although personally, I find the original Greek title a hundred times better and wayrepresentative of the essence of the book is clearly his best work, one of the most awe inspiring and by far THE most genuine and profound philosophical and personal book I have ever read Ever Asceticism Saviors Of God is very short, but a life changing experience I ve ac Nikos Kazantzakis is easily in my top 3 authors of all time andAsceticismtranslated asSaviors Of Godin English although personally, I find the original Greek title a hundred times better and wayrepresentative of the essence of the book is clearly his best work, one of the most awe inspiring and by far THE most genuine and profound philosophical and personal book I have ever read Ever Asceticism Saviors Of God is very short, but a life changing experience I ve actually read it before in college quite quickly, but words as strong as these need to be read again and again for the experience to make sense and I was too young and still too inexperienced a reader to understand that devouring a heavily philosophical book of this kind in a week was completely pointless I ve always disagreed with Oscar Wilde another top 3 author for me, coincidentally thatif one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all , because similarly to my other definitely top 10 maybe top 6 favourite author Nick Hornby,I don t reread books very often I m too conscious of both my ignorance and my mortality. Nevertheless, this is one case where Oscar is totally spot on Take your time with Asceticism Saviors Of God and remember to come back to it at a later time, or don t bother at all I remembered and I bothered and I was vindicated.Nikos Kazantzakis believes that we come from an abyss of darkness, we end to an abyss of darkness and the luminous short interval is what we call life Through Asceticism Saviors Of God, Kazantzakis digs deep into his soul, then pours out his soul to express his agony and his fear of the unknown and of the inherent oppositions in life Kazantzakis uses an individual, passionate, poetic yet coherent language to convey the philosophy that governs not only his work, but also his life, as he was a man of vision with a strong stance on hoping, fighting, being free and believing.I cannot vouch for the translated version sadly, but if it s half as breathtaking as the original text, then it s a no brainer, for me it would still be worth every second, every numbness in awe


  4. Blackfoot Blackfoot says:

    WE COME from a dark abyss, we end in a dark abyss, and we call the luminous interval life As soon as we are born the return begins, at once the setting forth and the coming back we die in every moment This book has to be read again and again to grasp and to bear constantly in mind the vision N.Kazantzakis wants to give His beliefs on how to live, how to die, how to hope, how to fight, how to be free, how to find God, how to save GodUsing a very strong and individual language, one can fee WE COME from a dark abyss, we end in a dark abyss, and we call the luminous interval life As soon as we are born the return begins, at once the setting forth and the coming back we die in every moment This book has to be read again and again to grasp and to bear constantly in mind the vision N.Kazantzakis wants to give His beliefs on how to live, how to die, how to hope, how to fight, how to be free, how to find God, how to save GodUsing a very strong and individual language, one can feel from the very first page the agony in his writing and is easily absorbed in it.Sometimes the same phrases are repeated over and over, but I guess this reveals the writer s solicitude for the world and helps the reader to befocused.The titles chapters may seem simple at first glance one can find though, that the whole of the writer s thinking is so complex and powerful and can t help but admire the concept and the ultimate structure of this book BLESSED BE ALL THOSE WHO HEAR AND RUSH TO FREE YOU, LORD, AND WHO SAY ONLY YOU AND I EXIST BLESSED BE ALL THOSE WHO FREE YOU AND BECOME UNITED WITH YOU, LORD, AND WHO SAY YOU AND I ARE ONE AND THRICE BLESSED BE THOSE WHO BEAR ON THEIR SHOULDERS AND DO NOT BUCKLE UNDER THIS GREAT, SUBLIME, AND TERRIFYING SECRET THAT EVEN THIS ONE DOES NOT EXIST Book for life I would say, but as N.Kazantzakis states theory has value only as a preparation, action is the crucial battle


  5. Gastjäle Gastjäle says:

    This book outlines the spiritual journey of one lost Greek, who is willing even to degrade God in case truth requires it Kazantzakis searched wide and far, and found suffering, reborn Asians proactive pie in the sky Christians Spirits progressing in their Hegelian cycles and warring Nietzschean bermensches all of which inspired him yet didn t satisfy his hunger He find the idea of an all powerful deity displeasing, perhaps because it indeed is rather OP, and a rather obvious sign of weakn This book outlines the spiritual journey of one lost Greek, who is willing even to degrade God in case truth requires it Kazantzakis searched wide and far, and found suffering, reborn Asians proactive pie in the sky Christians Spirits progressing in their Hegelian cycles and warring Nietzschean bermensches all of which inspired him yet didn t satisfy his hunger He find the idea of an all powerful deity displeasing, perhaps because it indeed is rather OP, and a rather obvious sign of weakness in men to worship such things solely because of such attributes Nor did he really enjoy the self mortification bit, not to mention endless rebirth as a new soul, seeking to relieve oneself of suffering It really seems like Kazantzakis finally submitted to the terrors of life and saw something ultimately real in them War, pain and death are all written into the bloodstream of the human race, and only by following this stream we can be saved Not quite, though Nikos uses the term himself Humans are destined to help out their maddened God to cast aside the cloak of flesh, to escape the Unnameable abyss, and to rise to a new level in other words, to perpetuate the recreation of their God Our salvation is to be ground to dust willfully like soldiers, knowing full well we ve done our duty out of loyalty and meekness towards this raging force we may as well term God We must accept our parts, trace our boundaries and crush them with recurring vehemence Constant self development until death, all for the sake of the pantheistic force who flees forever inside us all Sounds a bit glum, innit Cor it does indeed, and Kazantzakis makes a point of twisting the knife of mortality in all the wounds he manages to inflict on the reader We are nothing Our life is but a flash of lightning, soon forgotten Life is extreme emotions, both joy and fear, but they too are to be destroyed by us For God is beyond such frailty, and how can we hope to gain any understanding if we don t follow Him How can one not love what N.K is doing here He creates a new religion entirely for himself He feels the validity of it so deeply, that he can t help but obey, even though it s a religion of strife and empty flight He feels all the compelling things in life to emanate from this one source He is willing to stop at nothing to do this infinitesimal service to his deity of choice Meanwhile, he keeps battling with solipsism and Hegelian negations, nihilism and false hope He is intent on finding meaning in the coil of mortals, yet he s ready to accept its possible abhorrence Or to turn this abhorrence into reverence All the religions of the world belong to him, all the creatures too The stars, the galaxies, the whole cosmos seeks to expedite the Great Escape of God What enthralling thrall to serve such insanity It s the giddy megalomania and absolute honesty which bursts out of the pages like explosive pus from its pores, intoxicating the reader with its delirious, raw beauty The Saviors of God is a paradoxical parable of submissive defiance, one that oozes of the primeval breath of ages, passed on through the aeons It has no Alpha, it has no Omega it is Omicron, with a spiritus lenis dripping weakly along its curved, neverending flank into the eternity s abyss


  6. Rahil Rahil says:

    I need to read this book again It s one of these books that get clearer and deeper when you re read them I liked several parts, but hated the part when he mentioned Our Ancestors , our duty towards them and their impact in our lives 3.My favourite quotes were And And I liked the love story that his wife t I need to read this book again It s one of these books that get clearer and deeper when you re read them I liked several parts, but hated the part when he mentioned Our Ancestors , our duty towards them and their impact in our lives 3.My favourite quotes were And And I liked the love story that his wife told at the end of the book , I should read the book she wrote about them and their life 3


  7. كوثر أمين كوثر أمين says:

    very poetic book and very deep I think it is not a book to understand but to feel


  8. Thomas Tyrer Thomas Tyrer says:

    Redundant NihilismI ve always been intrigued by The Last Temptation of Christ and Zorba the Greek and their philosophies of rectifying the spiritual and the physical So I wanted to enjoy Saviors of God and was disappointed when I didn t The opening essay establishes the historical and cultural contexts within which the author created the work and yet plodded forward in tedium I m well versed in deep and often complex texts, but I found Kazantzakis to make one point that man and God Redundant NihilismI ve always been intrigued by The Last Temptation of Christ and Zorba the Greek and their philosophies of rectifying the spiritual and the physical So I wanted to enjoy Saviors of God and was disappointed when I didn t The opening essay establishes the historical and cultural contexts within which the author created the work and yet plodded forward in tedium I m well versed in deep and often complex texts, but I found Kazantzakis to make one point that man and God constantly rise from the base and fall short of the sublime to seek equilibrium and then repeat it in a myriad of somewhat similar ways This was a book that I actually wanted to put down many, many times, and yet because it was so short, remained with it But in the end, I found it not so much a waste of time as a journey that fell far short of what Kazantzakis had previously inspired


  9. Hazem Hazem says:

    For a journey that is driven to its beginnings by words such as WE COME from a dark abyss, we end in a dark abyss, and we call the luminous interval life. One expects to find something way beyond a try to present not only a foggy view of the relation ship between man and god, but a rather limiting one, one that s hard to believe a man from whom i expected so much, could actually have.Yet, and to be fair, the mysteriousness this book had to figure out the final condemnation was a thrill, and t For a journey that is driven to its beginnings by words such as WE COME from a dark abyss, we end in a dark abyss, and we call the luminous interval life. One expects to find something way beyond a try to present not only a foggy view of the relation ship between man and god, but a rather limiting one, one that s hard to believe a man from whom i expected so much, could actually have.Yet, and to be fair, the mysteriousness this book had to figure out the final condemnation was a thrill, and the fact that such a condemnation doesn t even exist, but is left open for us to make, was rather an impressive reflection of the way in which this man thought, on the way in which this man wrote. That s why it deserves four stars and a tiny little bit further


  10. Justin Justin says:

    Hard to read understand I think there is wisdom here but its format is off putting for me This is formatted as a series of truisms, but the language isn t straight forward in my opinion and the truisms seem repetitive A lack of clear organization makes it harder.The wisdom that was also in Zorba was muchenjoyable encouraging to understand in Zorba.That being said, I think there is a great deal of juicy meat in here, I just wish the nut was easier to crack.


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