What the Numbers Say: A Field Guide to Mastering Our

What the Numbers Say: A Field Guide to Mastering Our Numerical World ❴BOOKS❵ ✯ What the Numbers Say: A Field Guide to Mastering Our Numerical World Author Derrick Niederman – Buyprobolan50.co.uk Our society is churning out numbers than ever before, whether in the form of spreadsheets, brokerage statements, survey results, or just the numbers on the sports pages Unfortunately, people s ability Our society is churning out numbers than Numbers Say: PDF Ê ever before, whether in the form of spreadsheets, brokerage statements, survey results, or just the numbers on the sports pages Unfortunately, people s ability to understand and analyze numbers isn t keeping pace with today s whizzing data streams And the benefits of living in the Information Age are available only to those who can process the information in front of them What the Numbers Say offers remedies to this national problem Through a series of witty and engaging discussions, the What the ePUB ´ authors introduce original quantitative concepts, skills, and habits that reduce even the most daunting numerical challenges to simple, bite sized pieces Why do the nutritional values on a Cheerios box appear different in Canada than in the US How is it that top performing mutual funds often lose money for the majority of their shareholders Why was the scoring system for Olympic figure skating doomed even without biased judges By anchoring their discussions in real world scenarios, Derrick Niederman and David Boyum show that skilled quantitative thinking involves old the Numbers Say: ePUB ↠ fashioned logic, not advanced mathematical tools Useful in an endless number of situations, What the Numbers Say is the practical guide to navigating today s data rich world From the Hardcover edition.


About the Author: Derrick Niederman

Is a well known author, some of Numbers Say: PDF Ê his books are a fascination for readers like in the What the Numbers Say: A Field Guide to Mastering Our Numerical World book, this is one of the most wanted Derrick Niederman author readers around the world.



10 thoughts on “What the Numbers Say: A Field Guide to Mastering Our Numerical World

  1. Ted Ted says:

    See this review for comment which applies to both this book and The Numbers GameI found this book interesting enough to read it in a relatively short time, but was probably a little too familiar with much of the material to get a lot of new knowledge out of it For some reason I remember being a bitexcited about The Numbers Game by Michael Blastland, which I readrecently The goal of the two books is similar, basically they are trying to make See this review for comment which applies to both this book and The Numbers GameI found this book interesting enough to read it in a relatively short time, but was probably a little too familiar with much of the material to get a lot of new knowledge out of it For some reason I remember being a bitexcited about The Numbers Game by Michael Blastland, which I readrecently The goal of the two books is similar, basically they are trying to make the average personcomfortable andskillful in dealing with the sorts of numbers and number based evidence that we encounter in day to day living, and particularly in the news nowadays


  2. Manuel Frias Manuel Frias says:

    A good reminder of the importance of developing quantitative thinking skills whether you work with data or not.I like the definition of a good quantitative thinker what distinguishes good quantitative thinkers is not their skill with pure mathematics, but rather their approach to quantitative information.The book goes through all the skills necessary to survive in the Quantitative Information Age in plain English with lots of examples My problem was that it is focused on American readers whi A good reminder of the importance of developing quantitative thinking skills whether you work with data or not.I like the definition of a good quantitative thinker what distinguishes good quantitative thinkers is not their skill with pure mathematics, but rather their approach to quantitative information.The book goes through all the skills necessary to survive in the Quantitative Information Age in plain English with lots of examples My problem was that it is focused on American readers which means there are a lot of examples of politicians and baseball that I didn t really understand.I liked especially the last chapter where the authors explain the different schools there are in teaching mathematics


  3. John Fredrickson John Fredrickson says:

    This is a very informative guide to how we mess up our appreciation for what numerical arguments are indicating The book is easy to follow the math is not calculus, but rather takes as its focus the math that we get exposed to on a regular basis, and how we foul up its interpretation It is well worth reading.


  4. Greg Greg says:

    This is a pretty important book that I think most adults and certainly all educators should read Although it got a little ramble toward the end, this will probably be one I get a copy of and keep close by in my office I plan to take some notes on a few ideas to use for workshops in my role as the assessment coordinator for the division The main function, I think, will be to help people be less afraid of numbers and data an develop some strategies that, the authors contend, we all should have This is a pretty important book that I think most adults and certainly all educators should read Although it got a little ramble toward the end, this will probably be one I get a copy of and keep close by in my office I plan to take some notes on a few ideas to use for workshops in my role as the assessment coordinator for the division The main function, I think, will be to help people be less afraid of numbers and data an develop some strategies that, the authors contend, we all should have become proficient in during high school The distinction between mathematics and quantitative reasoning and the simple, straightforward responses to the age old question, why do we have to learn this are really key I would love to see some of the ideas promoted here becomeingrained in our curriculum


  5. Russell Russell says:

    Get this book Today Here s an .com link to the book Or check out from your local library Doesn t matter, just get this book.Why Because this is the best book I ve read that teaches you how to understand the numbers thrown at us daily and how to be a quantitative thinker.It explains the math tools you can use to cut through the deluge of numbers and facts and how to glean meaningful data.After reading this, pass it on to someone else Get this book Today Here s an .com link to the book Or check out from your local library Doesn t matter, just get this book.Why Because this is the best book I ve read that teaches you how to understand the numbers thrown at us daily and how to be a quantitative thinker.It explains the math tools you can use to cut through the deluge of numbers and facts and how to glean meaningful data.After reading this, pass it on to someone else


  6. Sam Sam says:

    A very practical tool for improving your quantitative reasoning For those that are numerically lazy like me , this is a good reminder of the many benefits of taking the time to think through a problem before reaching for the calculator and it provides an excellent toolbox for making the most of the quantitative world in which we live.


  7. Mike Simmons Mike Simmons says:

    A solid book on the nuances of how numbers are represented to the public I am a CPA and often have to present numbers in a simplified yet complete way This book talks about how quantitative facts and calculations can be misleading intentionally or unintentionally I recommend reading this to give perspective to every day stories like the federal deficit, measuring flour, olympic scoring, etc.


  8. Abby Jean Abby Jean says:

    good enough straightforward discussion on using math and common sense in everyday life didn t love the obscure stock market examples a bit basic, although the section on pareto s law was especially interesting engaging with good examples.


  9. Peter Peter says:

    Statistics, their use and misuse, and how much they matter in daily life Gives a lot of hints of what to look for to identify misleading statistics and how much of an impact their deliberate misuse can have Very interesting, and funny enough for any reader.


  10. Raine Carraway Raine Carraway says:

    Interesting


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *