☂ Bad Debts PDF / Epub ✐ Author Peter Temple – Buyprobolan50.co.uk



10 thoughts on “Bad Debts

  1. says:

    I caught her scent as I took the coat and jacket It was, in a word, throaty This is nice, she said, looking around.We stood awkwardly for a moment, something trembling in the air between us I looked around at the books in piles on every surface, the CDs and tapes everywhere, the unhung pictures, seeing the place for the first time in years It s sort of gentlemen s club mates with undergraduate student digs, she said Guy Pearce is Jack Irish.Jack Irish was once a high rising, reasonab I caught her scent as I took the coat and jacket It was, in a word, throaty This is nice, she said, looking around.We stood awkwardly for a moment, something trembling in the air between us I looked around at the books in piles on every surface, the CDs and tapes everywhere, the unhung pictures, seeing the place for the first time in years It s sort of gentlemen s club mates with undergraduate student digs, she said Guy Pearce is Jack Irish.Jack Irish was once a high rising, reasonably successful lawyer when tragedy strikes What this woman caller sees in Jack s flat are the results of a quick spiral downward Although I must say the description sort of sounds like a mini paradise to me I ve had apartments that resembled that ensemble Jack is still a lawyer, but barely He helps a man named Harry Strang with some shady horse dealings He helps with loan shark collections He helps people find people, but he is not a private investigator, though as the story goes, you ll be wondering why he doesn t just apply for his licensing and make it official As part of his self therapy, once he pulled his head out of the bottle, he starts hanging out at the local woodworking shop Charlie isn t too keen on acquiring an apprentice, but Irish keeps coming around, and before too long, Charlie can t help himself from showing Irish how things are done I ve done some woodworking in my past I ve built cedar chests, cabinets, bookshelves, and desks Doing something with your hands is unbelievably cathartic I put words on pages every day, and even though that is satisfying, sometimes I just need to go outside to muck in the garden or pull some old boards from the rafters and see if I can conceive of something to make with them Seeing something tangible, built with your own hands, is so satisfying The woodworking nuances threaded into the plot add some depth to the character of Irish that make my developing relationship with him that much stronger Irish has finally made it to a level of competence that Charlie is trusting him with a special order, though Jack is finding it difficult to make something this beautiful that won t be revered in someone s homeI studied the rough walnut boards with reverence This was one of the classic furniture timbers Very few makers ever had the chance to work with wood of this quality and size Did an emerging mining company deserve a table made from unobtainable timber air dried for at least fifty years I loved Charlie s responseThis arschloch I m not making it for, he said He s just the first owner I m making it for all the owners The trouble begins with a message left by an ex client Danny McKillop The name doesn t ring any bells for Jack He attempts to get in touch, but they keep missing one another When McKillop ends up dead, Jack s curiosity is aroused As he starts to resurrect McKillop s recent anddistant past, some of Jack s memories regarding Danny s case starts to resurface It wasn t the best time in Jack s life to have him as your attorney He was self abusing himself at an alarming rate over the death of his wife When you read the book and find out exactly how she died, you ll have evenunderstanding of his state of mindI wasn t walking around drunk, crying in pubs, getting into fights with strangers because I was blaming myself I was in a state of incoherent rage I had lost someone who had cast a glow into every corner of my life I was entitled to my feelings Loss Hate Hopelessness WorthlessnessTheIrish peers into the past thehe starts to realize that things were missed in the McKillop case There were greater forces at work than he or even Danny were aware As Jack pokes and prods about, he soon discovers that the strings connecting to the case lead all the way to Parliament Even if he wants to back off, he is already in too deep The series is set in Melbourne, Australia I was reading about Jack going here and there, and so finally, I pulled up a map of Melbourne I spent a bit of time familiarizing myself with the layout of the streets By the end of the book, I wasn t having to look at the map any but could visualize where Jack was in the city There is some Australian slang scattered throughout the book Some are familiar to me, and some are self evident, but there are a few I had to google to be sure they are what I think they are I know things like this annoy some readers, but for me, all it does is add authenticity to my reading experience Peter TempleThere is a Jack Irish series available, starring Guy Pearce, which has two seasons In addition, there are three movies that precede the series, also starring Guy Pearce, that are based on the novels There are only four Jack Irish novels, which is too few for sure, but unfortunately, Peter Temple passed away in 2018 I have not seen the movies yet because I decided to read the books first I am watching the first season of the series, and it is terrific so far Guy Pearce has always been one of my favorite actors, and the role fits him like a glove So you have many choices about how you want to get to know Jack Irish, but whichever way you choose, I highly recommend making his acquaintance If you wish to seeof my most recent book and movie reviews, visithttp www.jeffreykeeten.comI also have a Facebook blogger page at


  2. says:

    There s nothing not to like here good writing, complicated plot, fun setting in Australia However, if you ve read enough of this type of book, you can go through the checklist Black best friend Check Tragic experience in past Check Recovering alcoholic Check Police contacts Reporter girlfriend Colorful friends Check, check, check There s nothing new here, but it s fun.


  3. says:

    The plotting is always convoluted in a Peter Temple read You do at times scratch your head but thenthere s so much verve in these pages peopled with some beautifully drawn characters and a tangible sense of place and time that the ride is something you are not keen on concluding.Jack Irish as gumshoes go is very credible indeed He comes to us in this, in the first of the series, fully formed Dodgy Opportunistic Living on the edge at bit But genuinely one of us Neither a cowboy The plotting is always convoluted in a Peter Temple read You do at times scratch your head but thenthere s so much verve in these pages peopled with some beautifully drawn characters and a tangible sense of place and time that the ride is something you are not keen on concluding.Jack Irish as gumshoes go is very credible indeed He comes to us in this, in the first of the series, fully formed Dodgy Opportunistic Living on the edge at bit But genuinely one of us Neither a cowboy nor spiv A tad cowardly He s not even one iota psychopathic As a lawyer who has decided to live closer to the street and on his wits, Jack Irish is a stand out crime fiction remake Aiding him is a lot of discursive humour and a great command of Australian cultural s and peculiarities Evenso Jack Irish is oh so very much a Melbourne boy that I pity those whose roots are elsewhere because they d miss the papable reflection that draws so much on the city and its people to enliven it For some of us, reading Bad Debts is almost as good as a visit back home


  4. says:

    The first of the Jack Irish series of Aussie noir investigations fiercely written, crammed with brutal and brilliant creations, with gems of dazzling dialogue enlivening every encounter It s a bit less literary and a lot less gruelling than some of Temple s standalone stories, which tends to leave you feeling emotionally hollowed out But it retains all of the author s acerbic skill at single line character assassination, and his outstanding use of colloquial English to masterfully portray The first of the Jack Irish series of Aussie noir investigations fiercely written, crammed with brutal and brilliant creations, with gems of dazzling dialogue enlivening every encounter It s a bit less literary and a lot less gruelling than some of Temple s standalone stories, which tends to leave you feeling emotionally hollowed out But it retains all of the author s acerbic skill at single line character assassination, and his outstanding use of colloquial English to masterfully portray a sense of place and purpose Witty and gripping a cracking additional to the international crime scene.Ideal if you enjoyed Black Fly Season by Giles Blunt or Steve Hamilton s Canadian thrillers.8 10There are manyreviews of crime thrillers over at


  5. says:

    A few months ago Pam and I watched, over a period of two or three weeks, the three Jack Irish TV movies and the second of the two series that followed those movies our library didn t have the first series The stars of the show are Guy Pearce, Aaron Pedersen and, at least in the movies, Marta Dusseldorp These Australian outings are much recommended, with some great character actors supporting the principals.So, of course, I decided to get hold of the first novel in the late Peter Temple s ser A few months ago Pam and I watched, over a period of two or three weeks, the three Jack Irish TV movies and the second of the two series that followed those movies our library didn t have the first series The stars of the show are Guy Pearce, Aaron Pedersen and, at least in the movies, Marta Dusseldorp These Australian outings are much recommended, with some great character actors supporting the principals.So, of course, I decided to get hold of the first novel in the late Peter Temple s series that formed the basis for the TV pieces For obvious reasons I delayed the reading for a few months to make sure the first of the TV movies was no longer fresh in my mind as we old geezers like to euphemize.The long and the short is that I enjoyed Bad Debts rather a lot less than I thought I was going to.The setup s great After the murder of his wife, lawyer Jack Irish hit the bottle Now he still does some low level lawyering, but most of his time is spent working as a debt collector, conducting dubious business around the racetrack and, as a therapeutic hobby, serving as much derided apprentice to a master cabinetmaker Checking his voicemail after a brief absence he finds a message from a client, Danny, whom he represented a decade ago so long ago he has only the vaguest recollection of the case Soon Jack learns that, by the time he played that message, Danny was dead, shot down in a parking lot by the cops he was supposedly threatening with a gun.Reluctantly, feeling his representation of Danny back in the day was somehow inadequate, Jack essays to reinvestigate the old case the hit and run killing of an environmental activist and discovers there was indeedto it than met the eye Slowly he uncovers a major conspiracy involving corrupt cops and rising to the upper levels of state politics .I was initially very much engaged, too, by Temple s prose Jack Irish is an entertainingly laconic, cynical observer of the human condition and indeed of his own foibles a narrator much in the Philip Marlowe vein, indeed, but with a strong Australian accent The language is extraordinarily salty, to the extent that it might upset some and there s a fair deal of Ozzie slang mixed in among the rest Some of the words I didn t recognize, though I had no difficulty teasing out their meaning from context A few chapters in I was singing the book s praises, and then, I dunno, I began to get a bit bogged down in it The sessions spent cabinetmaking and at the racetrack began to seem overextended and rather dull Maybe not so dull if you re into woodwork or horse racing, but alasMatters weren t helped by the fact that the plot really is quite exceptionally convoluted, and in places I was having to think hard to work out who was who And the droll observations that had earlier made me grin now seemed a shade long winded, obstructions to the telling of the tale rather than the oil that made it flow so easily.There were also a couple of sequences where I had difficulty working out what was going on One of them I remembered from the movie it s pretty climactic scene and I actually read the relevant paragraphs three times to make sure I hadn t missed something To be enigmatic, a gun seems from the written description to appear from nowhere So, although it grieves me to say this, when I reached the final page of Bad Debts it was with something of a sigh of relief It s not that the book s bad far from it it has many riches , just that it seemed to be way harder to get through than it should have been Other readers may find exactly the opposite


  6. says:

    novel read for a college course SUMMARY Jack Irish is an ex lawyer, and when he receives a voicemail from a recently released client, Danny McKillop, he is confused After dismissing the phone call, Danny turns up dead, murdered in a police standoff Jack is riddled with guilt and decides to delve into the past But Jack soon learns that there are a lot of people who would kill to keep the past hidden, and that Danny s death may be part of a larger cover up REVIEW As someone who gr novel read for a college course SUMMARY Jack Irish is an ex lawyer, and when he receives a voicemail from a recently released client, Danny McKillop, he is confused After dismissing the phone call, Danny turns up dead, murdered in a police standoff Jack is riddled with guilt and decides to delve into the past But Jack soon learns that there are a lot of people who would kill to keep the past hidden, and that Danny s death may be part of a larger cover up REVIEW As someone who grew up in Melbourne, I adored reading this for the Australian slang and the Melbourne culture It made the booksenjoyable and I found myself smiling at the football remarks The only part that didn t mesh well for me was the horse racing and betting Even though I grew up around the culture, the jargon that was used went over my head This was the main reason why I gave this novel a 3 instead of a 4 star While I did feel like I could have put together the mystery myself and solved it quickly, I did not see that way that it would unfold I was quite shocked by the way the events came together and how the violence escalated toward the end I also loved how the plots were intertwined and the revelations we learnt from both Jack and Linda Linda was awesome I loved her character and her dominant presence She would not stand down and let other people walk over her I also thought that the relationship between her and Jack has a lot of potential and would be interested to see how it goes in future novels


  7. says:

    Ehh Same story has been told a thousand times Too many names of too many bad guys Brush up on your Australian slang beforehand you ll need it.


  8. says:

    Set mainly in Melbourne, once a criminal lawyer, John Jack Irish is now making his way out of a dark period of life that he drifted into after the death of his second wife who died at the hands of an unhappy client Trying to deal with his pain, Jack drowned his sorrows in alcohol and became a collector of serious debts, as well as a gambler betting on the ponies He does some odd work for a couple of men in the horse racing business But there s another side to Jack as a sort of therapy, Set mainly in Melbourne, once a criminal lawyer, John Jack Irish is now making his way out of a dark period of life that he drifted into after the death of his second wife who died at the hands of an unhappy client Trying to deal with his pain, Jack drowned his sorrows in alcohol and became a collector of serious debts, as well as a gambler betting on the ponies He does some odd work for a couple of men in the horse racing business But there s another side to Jack as a sort of therapy, he also helps a friend make furniture, finding a bit of peace and pride in his work, and he has a huge heart He s a dad to daughter Claire He tries to stay on the side of law and order, but there are moments when he sometimes has to cross over that border.As the novel opens, Jack checks his answering machine to find a number of messages from a client, Danny McKillop, who Jack once defended in a hit and run accident He pleads with Jack to meet him, but Jack doesn t remember him at the time and the last message was left a couple of days earlier Now curious, Jack digs into the case files, where he discovers that McKillop had been accused of the death of Anne Jeppeson, a young activist some ten years earlier McKillop had pleaded guilty after a witness positively ID d him as the driver of the car McKillop had pleaded guilty and received ten years for his crime Now out, it seems that he really wants to talk to Jack As Jack pokes around, he starts thinking that perhaps McKillop wasn t the one behind the wheel little does he know that he is opening a veritable Pandora s box of an investigation, helped along by a gorgeous journalist named Linda Hillier It isn t long until he discovers that someone is willing to kill to keep Jack from getting to the truth In a story that is part hardboiled noir with added bits of action packed conspiracy thriller, Jack has to navigate between bullets, explosions and a host of shady people to get to the truth The problem is that Jack has no idea who to trust.My first experience with Peter Temple is with his The Broken Shore, which I loved and which has muchof a literary feel to it than does Bad Debts Having said that, Bad Debts really kept me on my toes and kept my brain engaged trying to figure out the 10 year old mystery of Danny McKillop And while I m normally not a huge fan of the fast paced variety of thriller conspiracy novel, this one I liked, not only because of the writing in which Temple has crafted a very tightly woven and controlled story despite the number of crazy twists and turns, but also because of the characters, especially, but not limited to, Jack himself Rarely do I like a first series novel this much, but I was sucked in from the beginning and just couldn t let it go


  9. says:

    Geeze, Temple is good I mean, this is no Broken Shore, and has all his usual way too many coincidences problems And what s with his obsession with street kid porn But damn he writes a likeable protagonist Is there anyone who wouldn t like Jack Irish I just love the way Temple writes dialogue and describes things I d love to see him write some not crime, cause really, I don t care much for crime Anyway, read this in two days Just couldn t stop.


  10. says:

    Occasional lawyer and part time sleuth, Jack Irish is used to trouble Taking work as a debt collector he idles away his spare time at the racetrack or helping out in a cabinetmaker s shop But when a former client leaves a message on Jack s answering machine, he ignores it until the next day, by which time the caller has been shot and killed A sense of obligation pushes Jack to investigate, but while the case seems to go nowhere, things suddenly start to happen Dangerous things.This is the fi Occasional lawyer and part time sleuth, Jack Irish is used to trouble Taking work as a debt collector he idles away his spare time at the racetrack or helping out in a cabinetmaker s shop But when a former client leaves a message on Jack s answering machine, he ignores it until the next day, by which time the caller has been shot and killed A sense of obligation pushes Jack to investigate, but while the case seems to go nowhere, things suddenly start to happen Dangerous things.This is the first volume in the Jack Irish Thriller series and the first I ve read by Peter Temple The author s clever use of language, with its mix of Aussie colloquialisms and witty observations reminded me of James Ellroy, though the style is quite different The story slides around for a while appearing to go nowhere in particular, but then the plot begins to fall into place, bringing the strands together and creating a clever and unexpected story that left me hungry forWhat I really liked was the way that, even though this is the first book, Temple presents his hero fully formed and raring to go.A thoroughly enjoyable read


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Bad Debts A Phone Message From Ex Client Danny McKillop Doesn T Ring Any Bells For Jack Irish Life Is Hard Enough Without Having To Dredge Up Old Problems His Beloved Football Team Continues To Lose, The Odds On His Latest Plunge At The Track Seem Far Too Long, And He S Still Cooking For One When Danny Turns Up Dead, Jack Is Forced To Take A Walk Back Into The Dark And Dangerous PastWith Suspenseful Prose And Black Humor, Peter Temple Builds An Unforgettable Character In Jack Irish And Brings The Reader On A Journey That Is As Intelligent As It Is Exciting