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10 thoughts on “La vida es sueño

  1. supernal supernal says:

    This book has to be the most amazing play that I've ever read There are those that say that Pedro Calderon is second only to the great William Shakespeare in terms of playwright but I have to say that I think that Pedro's writing at the very least matches ShakespeareDon't get me wrong When properly translated Shakespearian writing can have a profound and powerful effect the likes of which are scarcely recreated in contemporary writing but I feel the same can be said of Pedro CalderonI recommend this book to anyone who has wondered about the substance of their existence about what makes their reality concrete than any other or who just enjoys intense fits of philosophy inspired by intense bits of text


  2. Alan Allis Alan Allis says:

    Life Is a Dream is the most beautiful play I have ever read and I have read uite a few Pedro Calderon de la Barca does magic here I love Shakespeare Lope de Vega and Ibsen also Beckett Shaw and Pirandello to name just few but Life Is a Dream is the start of everything they wrote And I think the best start that could be


  3. E. G. E. G. says:

    IntroductionSuggestions for Further ReadingA Note on the Translation Life Is a Dream Explanatory Notes


  4. Miquixote Miquixote says:

    A metaphor for authority and oppression Is authority justified in oppressing us because it believes we would bring disaster if empowered?Lying about our weakness authority manages to keep us unaware until it betrays what little it has left of humanity and gives us a degree of freedom When we experience that freedom this discovery of our limited freedoms make us violent and we rageHorrified and certain of the truthfulness of their fears authority has us drugged and returned to our prisons We mourn believing everything to be nothing than a spectacleThough we remain oblivious in our cells some have really discovered our plight and would like to break us out of prison the revolutionaries Though we will probably rejoice if this happens we cannot be sure whether this new development would be in fact reality or still just another spectacleThe rebels persist though and raise an army of the people Together the rebels defeat the authority but the people still need their chosen leader The newly ‘liberated’ leader decides not to take the old authority’s life The book naively? presumes that the authority would be moved at this gesture and proclaim the son heir The chosen resolves to live by acknowledging that one must strive for goodness in both dream and realityA book that reveals a need for the archetypal hero who fights for freedom in this case a uixotic character unsure of what is real and what is not a romantic appeal to a non violent revolution freeing us from an over emphasis on mystification opening up a new degree of freedom that of reality But allowing us still the freedom that is given by the spirit of the myth the ideal the archetype the unconscious the immaterial the imaginatory the romantic the spectacle and ultimately art in all its gloryGoodness in reality and in dream The creation of a dialectic between dream and reality between the unconscious and the conscious through the gain of social power One is only left to wonder if social inclusion will follow from this new leader or will it simply be a new authority?


  5. Cáitín Cáitín says:

    I really enjoyed reading this play the language is so beautiful and flowed so nice it was fun to read and I could follow the storyline uite wellThis play is wrote in a way that once you begin reading the text is like an old song and you find its rhyming works very well


  6. Debbie Zapata Debbie Zapata says:

    This play was first published in the 1600's in Spain The translation I read at Project Gutenberg was published in 1873 The introduction by the translator included this information A note by Hartzenbusch in the last edition of the drama published at Madrid 1872 tells that La Vida es Sueno is founded on a story which turns out to be substantially the same as that with which English students are familiar as the foundation of the famous Induction to the Taming of the Shrew Calderon found it however in a different work from that in which Shakespeare met with it or rather his predecessor the anonymous author of The Taming of a Shrew whose work supplied to Shakespeare the materials of his own comedyI have seen a movie version of The Taming Of The Shrew who could forget Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor? but I don't remember ever reading the play itself It has been added to my Someday list now though I will want to read that 'famous Induction' for myselfMeanwhile back in Spainno back in Poland since that is where our action takes placewe are introduced to Rosaura who is a young lady masuerading as a man in order to get revenge for something which we do not learn until later She and her companion Clarin the reuisite clownish servant stumble across the hidden tower where Prince Sigismund has been chained his entire life They are discovered by the nobleman Clotaldo who takes them to the castle to turn them over to the King But there is a lot going on beneath the surface Clotaldo seems to recognize Rosaura but why? Why does the King who is considered so wise rely so much on astrology and what troubles has that caused him and his country? Why is Prince Sigismund a prisoner in the first place? And the dream? Just where does that come into the plot? Does everyone get their heart's desire by the final curtain? Or is it all just a dream?This was a fun little romp with some lovely phrases throughout and a profound message about lifeand how to live it tossed out bit by bit in the final act I enjoyed the play but I would like to read it in the original Spanish someday if possible There are some speeches with puns and wordplay in them that would sound much better in Spanish The translator completely changed a few lines in the last act because he did not like the original puns which made sense in Spanish but not in English This can be a problem with Spanish especially when it is spoken because many words can be used in puns The translator added a footnote explaining what he did and whyCalderon is another new author to me but I want to explore of his work I uote the wiki article Pedro Calderón de la Barca y Barreda González de Henao Ruiz de Blasco y Riaño usually referred as Pedro Calderón de la Barca ; 17 January 1600 – 25 May 1681 was a dramatist poet and writer of the Spanish Golden Age During certain periods of his life he was also a soldier and a Roman Catholic priest Born when the Spanish Golden Age theatre was being defined by Lope de Vega he developed it further his work being regarded as the culmination of the Spanish Baroue theatre As such he is regarded as one of Spain's foremost dramatists and one of the finest playwrights of world literature SigismundIn this world's uncertain gleamThat to live is but to dreamMan dreams what he is and wakesOnly when upon him breaksDeath's mysterious morning beam


  7. Christopher (Donut) Christopher (Donut) says:

    Clotaldo Who guards my son with old fidelity Shall bring him hither from his tower by night Lockt in a sleep so fast as by my art I rivet to within a link of death But yet from death so far that next day's dawn Shall wake him up upon the royal bed Complete in consciousness and faculty When with all princely pomp and retinue My loyal Peers with due obeisance Shall hail him Segismund the Prince of PolandDon't know what to rate thisI was eager to read the FitzGerald translation but his version was not particularly enchanting or lyrical not to speak of literal I'm sure the uasi Shakespearean diction was appropriate to a Spanish Renaissance or early modern play but in effect it came off as bookish


  8. Nina Nina says:

    I'm not usually so much impressed by theatre plays but this onethis one was very good I read it with so much curiosity and the plot is really interesting It was the first Spanish theatre play I've read and I didn't expect it to impress me so much Only Shakespeare and Dryden have done this to me before xD When they released Segismundo and after having commited murder and threats and took him back in the tower at that point I prefigured what will happen I already imagined that he will realise how bad he acted and that he will come on the right pathWhat I enjoyed the most was of course the changing of heart of the principal character the theme about life being a dream FA by many of us I suppose at some point in life and the verses So so beautiful verses full of meaning and teaching about life Interesting how he looked innocent in the first act then totally ravishing in the second and in the last act surprisingly goodI regret so much not having read it in Spanish but I will one day When I won't be so much pressed about time


  9. david david says:

    “Are you the fabulous hippogriff running in harness with the wind? Flameless thunderbolt featherless bird fish without scales Monster of the four elements without the instinct to check your headlong flight?”Dude wrote this play approximately one century post Shakespeare and Cervantes I was an infant then so I had to wait until now to read itThis is a well written piece about Kings and Ladies and their offspring and all that castle and aristocratic stuff that we have all come to readPretty pretty good as another David who uses it as his last name would say


  10. Deya Deya says:

    How do you know if you're awake?This was my og existencial crisis story and it hold amazingly well today


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La vida es sueño [Ebook] ➡ La vida es sueño By Pedro Calderón de la Barca – Buyprobolan50.co.uk He auí la creación más lograda y de carácter más universal de Calderón La vida es sueño es en síntesis la plasmación barroca de la idea de la fugacidad de la vida con todos los aditamentos ge He auí la creación más lograda y de carácter más universal de Calderón La vida es sueño es en síntesis la plasmación barroca de la idea de la fugacidad de la vida con todos los aditamentos geniales de construcción caracteres y estilo ue el autor supo imprimirle Con este pesimismo radical sobre el valor de la vida humana se interfiere el libre albedrío como afirmación personal de Segismundo —“¿y teniendo yo más vida tengo menos libertad”— Estos dos principios combinados crean una riueza enorme de sentidos ue en esta edición son desmenuzados críticamente por Ciriaco Morón Arroyo.